Josh Rubenstein

Current Position: Northeast Regional Director of Amnesty International USA and Associate at Harvardís Davis Center for Eurasian and Russian Studies

Brief Bio: Joshua Rubenstein has been professionally involved with human rights and international affairs for 30 years as an activist, scholar and journalist with particular expertise in Soviet affairs. A long-time Associate of Harvard's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, he has made many research trips to Moscow and other Russian cities. He has lectured and written widely on the Soviet human rights movement, including a series of lectures in Russian at the Mendeleev Institute in Moscow in the fall of 1990 and in the spring of 1991. Since 1975, Mr. Rubenstein has been the Northeast Regional Director of Amnesty International USA, overseeing Amnesty's work in New England, New York and New Jersey. He is author of Soviet Dissidents, Their Struggle for Human Rights (1980) and Tangled Loyalties: The Life and Times of Ilya Ehrenburg, a biography of the controversial Soviet writer and journalist. His book, Stalinís Secret Pogrom: the Postwar Inquisition of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee, was awarded the National Jewish Book Award in 2001-2002. Mr. Rubenstein has also contributed articles and reviews on Russian and international affairs to many publications including The New Republic, The Wall Street Journal, The Nation, The Columbia Journalism Review, The New York Times, and The Boston Globe.

Research Interests: history of Soviet Jewry; history of the Soviet human rights movement; the Holocaust on German-occupied Soviet territory.

Sample Publications:
  • Rubenstein, Joshua. Soviet Dissidents, Their Struggle for Human Rights. Beacon Press, 1980, 1981, 1985.
  • Rubenstein, Joshua. Tangled Loyalties, The Life and Times of Ilya Ehrenburg. Basic Books, 1996, 1999.
  • Rubenstein, Joshua. Stalin's Secret Pogrom: The Postwar Inquisition of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee. 2001.
  • Rubenstein, Joshua and Alexander Gribanov, Eds. The KGB File of Andrei Sakharov Yale University Press, 2005.


Perspective on Conference Themes: As we mark the 60th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials, it is imperative that the international community understand that the best way to commemorate them is to create an effective, standing International Criminal Court to prosecute government officials and others who are responsible for the most terrible of crimes, like genocide and crimes against humanity.