In Memoriam

1920-39 1940-49 1950-59 1960-69 1970-79 1980-

1920-1929

Matthew Brown '28 of Boston died Sept. 5, 2003. He practiced law for more than six decades, helping found what is now Brown Rudnick Berlack Israels in Boston in 1944. In the 1970s, he was a judge for the Municipal Court of Boston. He was president of the Combined Jewish Philanthropies and served as chairman of the endowment program for the group's 75th anniversary. For nine years, he was a Brookline, Mass., selectman, and he was a sergeant at arms for the Republican National Conventions of 1952 and 1956. A chairman of the board of Boston Broadcasters Inc. during the 1970s, he also funded the Brown Walk-in Clinic at Beth Israel Hospital and was a fellow at Brandeis University. After retiring, he served as a mediator in the Palm Beach (Fla.) Circuit Court.

George Turitz '28 of Washington, D.C., died Jan. 1, 2004. He was a lawyer and administrative law judge with the National Labor Relations Board. Earlier in his career, he worked for the legal department of the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration in San Juan and, in 1934, ran for Congress on the Socialist ticket for the 16th District of New York. During WWII, he served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, working in counterintelligence in North Africa.

Louis B. Eten '29 of Hackettstown, N.J., died April 5, 2003. He was a partner and later of counsel at Brown, Wood, Fuller, Caldwell & Ivey in New York City. He specialized in securities regulation.

John W. Munro '29 of Fayetteville, N.Y., died Dec. 9, 2003. He was a member of McDermott, Will & Emery in Chicago and what became Hancock & Estabrook in Syracuse, N.Y. After retiring, he served as an arbitrator in family court. He was a member of the American Iris Society.

Mortimer J. Shapiro '29 of Miami and West Orange, N.J., died Sept. 23, 2003. He was CEO of his family's business, the Sheppard Baking Co. in North Bergen, N.J. He previously practiced law in Newark. He was a director of Oheb Shalom Congregation in South Orange, was vice president of the Jewish Education Association of Metrowest and served on various committees of the Metrowest Jewish Federation.

Jackson E. Spears '29-'30 of New Canaan, Conn., died July 14, 2003. He was an investor and specialized in finance and philanthropy law. For 60 years, he was on the board of trustees of New York Medical College and served twice as president. He received three of the college's highest honors, and a community service award was established in his name there. He was also a director of Stamford Hospital, St. Joseph Hospital and Westchester Medical Center.

1930-1939

Charles P. Baker Jr. '30 of Painesville, Ohio, died Feb. 9, 2004. He was a Painesville Municipal Court judge, the city's law director, and owner and president of the Painesville Publishing Co. An expert in Ohio on township zoning law, he crafted the legislation that allowed townships to develop their own zoning codes. He was a lawyer for 61 years, founding his firm, Baker & Hackenberg, in Painesville in the early 1930s.

David R. Pokross '30 of Belmont, Mass., died Oct. 28, 2003. He practiced law in Boston for 72 years, 70 of which were with Nixon Peabody. Specializing in general corporate and electric public utility law, he also worked on corporate policy matters and estate planning. In the 1970s, he was chairman of the firm's executive committee, and he was later counsel to the firm, working several days a week until April 2003. He was involved in many charities and organizations in Massachusetts, including the Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston, the United Way of Massachusetts Bay, the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the American Jewish Historical Society. He was chairman of the board of overseers of the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University and established the David R. Pokross Fund for Children in Need through the Boston Foundation. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy.

Cleon H. Foust Jr. '30-'31 of Indianapolis died July 27, 2003. He was dean of Indiana University School of Law from 1967 to 1973. He retired in 1978, after 24 years at the law school, and served as chairman of the Indiana Correctional Code Study Commission. He was also vice chairman of the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute. From 1947 to 1949, he was attorney general of Indiana. Prior to that, he taught at Drake University School of Law in Des Moines, Iowa.

Sheldon G. Harlan '30-'31 of Ashton, Md., died Sept. 13, 2003. Formerly of Livingston, N.J., he was a program supervisor for the U.S. Bureau of the Census in New York City.

Patrick M. Hennessey '30-'31 of Bidwell, Ohio, died Sept. 6, 2003.

Bernard Phillips '31 of New York City died June 6, 2003. He was a sole practitioner specializing in foreign mergers. Earlier in his career, he practiced law at Gordon, Brady, Caffrey & Keller in New York City. In the early 1930s, he was assistant corporation counsel for the city of New York.

William C. Pierce '31 of West Baldwin, Maine, died Nov. 12, 2003. He was a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell in New York City, where he specialized in commercial banking, and trusts and estates. He was director of the European-American Banking Corp. and the European-American Bank and Trust Co. He was also chairman of the banking law section of the New York State Bar Association, a trustee of Bowdoin College and treasurer of Brown Memorial Library. A president of the Maine Historical Society, he published the article "The Rise and Fall of the York & Cumberland Rail Road" in the society's quarterly publication. During WWII, he was a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy.

Andrew B. Young '31 of Upper Gwynedd, Pa., died Aug. 21, 2003. Formerly of Chestnut Hill, Pa., he was a founder of Stradley Ronon Stevens & Young in Philadelphia, and he helped the firm grow from a three-lawyer partnership into a firm of more than 300 employees. He continued to work at the firm five days a week until a few months before his death at 96. He helped draft the 1954 Internal Revenue Code and served as chairman of the ABA's division of tax in 1963. He lectured on finance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and on tax at other universities and law schools. He was chairman of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. for more than 20 years. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Surgeon General's Office, converting businesses for the war effort.

Warner M. Bouck '32 of Albany, N.Y., died Feb. 19, 2004. For over 20 years, he was senior partner of Bouck, Holloway, Kiernan & Casey in Albany, joining the firm as a partner in the 1940s. He served on several committees of the New York State Bar Association and the New York State Bar Foundation and was a board member of many civic and cultural organizations, including the Albany Institute of History and Art and the Albany Medical College. During WWII, he was a contract administration officer in the U.S. Navy.

Ray I. Hardin '33 of Basking Ridge, N.J., died Sept. 9, 2003. He practiced tax law at what is now Dewey Ballantine in New York City.

Thomas A. Keegan '33 of Rockford, Ill., died Sept. 27, 2003. He was a trial and general practice attorney in Rockford for more than 50 years. Early in his career, he was an Illinois assistant attorney general and a chief trial attorney for the Office of Price Administration in Washington, D.C. In 1959, he was elected to the American College of Trial Lawyers. He joined the U.S. Navy during WWII and served as officer in charge of the Armed Guard on merchant ships. He later served as counsel to Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal.

Henry P. Phyfe '33-'35 of New York City died April 17, 2003. He was a physician and the great-grandson of Duncan Phyfe, an American furniture maker. He was a member of the Harvard Club of New York City and led the club's weekly Shakespeare group.

Kenneth C. Davis '34 of La Jolla, Calif., died Aug. 30, 2003. A legal scholar and pioneer in the field of administrative law, he taught at the University of San Diego School of Law from 1976 until his retirement in 1994. He helped create the field of administrative law as a unified body of law, publishing "Administrative Law" in 1951 and a multivolume treatise on the topic in 1958. He helped draft the 1946 Administrative Procedure Act. Earlier in his career, he was a lawyer both in private practice and with the federal government. He later taught at many universities, including as a visiting professor at HLS from 1948 to 1950. He held a chaired professorship at the University of Chicago until 1976 and published more than eight dozen scholarly articles in national law journals. In 1979, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

Frederic P. Houston '34 of Bristol, Maine, died Sept. 6, 2003. Formerly of New York, he was a senior member and counsel of Otterbourg, Steindler, Houston & Rosen in New York City, a firm his father co-founded in 1909. He was counsel to the Textile Fabrics Association and associate counsel and general counsel of the New York Board of Trade. He helped found the House of the Redeemer, an Episcopal retreat center in New York City, where he served in executive positions for 45 years. He served as a captain in the U.S. Army Air Forces in England and attained the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Reserve.

Ralph E. Bowers '35 of Lake Forest, Ill., died Oct. 23, 2003. He was vice president, corporate counsel and corporate secretary for Marshall Field & Co. in Chicago. He later served as of counsel to Vedder, Price, Kaufman & Kammholz. During WWII, he served as an industry member of the National War Labor Board.

James B. Gordon '35 of Chestertown, Md., died March 25, 2003. He was a lawyers' search consultant.

John R.L. Johnson Jr. '35 of Rockland, Del., died Dec. 23, 2003. A longtime employee of Hercules Powder Co. in Wilmington, Del., he joined the company as assistant general counsel in 1936 and was elected vice president and a member of the executive and finance committees in 1955. He served on several organizations' boards, including as director and president of the College of William & Mary Alumni Society and trustee of the college's endowment association.

Martin A. Jurow '35 of Dallas died Feb. 12, 2004. A studio executive in Hollywood and New York, he was an assistant to movie titans Jack L. Warner and Hal B. Wallis and an independent producer for movies, including "Breakfast at Tiffany's," "The Pink Panther" and "The Great Race." As an agent for MCA and the William Morris Agency, he was instrumental in the making of "My Fair Lady," "Oklahoma!," "South Pacific," "The King and I," "Guys and Dolls" and "The Music Man." He later moved to Dallas and continued to work on films, including "Terms of Endearment." He became an assistant district attorney for Dallas County and taught a course at Southern Methodist University.

Bernard W. Slater '35 of Beulah, Mich., died Dec. 20, 2003. He was president of the Histacount Corp., a printing company in Melville, N.Y.

Howland S. Warren '35 of Nahant, Mass., died July 29, 2003. An attorney and bank executive for nearly four decades, he was vice president and counsel of Old Colony Trust Co., trust counsel of First National Bank of Boston and counsel at Herrick and Smith in Boston. He served on many boards, including as a trustee of Children's Hospital and as treasurer of the New England Conservatory of Music. He was also a member of the Boston Athenaeum and the Tavern Club, a group of amateur playwrights. His father was HLS Professor Joseph Warren LL.B. 1900. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy in Sicily and the Pacific.

Herbert D. Tobin '35-'36 of Newport Beach, Calif., died Nov. 3, 2003. A longtime residential developer, he was president of Frank I. Tobin and Sons and built homes in New England and California. In 1937, he helped establish one of the first chapters of the National Association of Home Builders and served as president of the Building Industry Association and the Residential Builders Council. In 1974, he received the highest honor of the Building Industry Association of Southern California, the Meritorious Award. He was a member of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Mounted Posse and was a sworn reserve deputy for 25 years. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve.

Duane E. Minard Jr. '35-'37 of Boonton, N.J., died Dec. 22, 2003. He was CEO and chairman of the board of Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey.

Abraham S. Guterman '36 of Mamaroneck, N.Y., died Feb. 11, 2004. A tax, trusts and estates attorney, he was a partner at Hess, Segall, Guterman, Pelz, Steiner & Bavorick, which merged with Loeb & Loeb in New York City in 1986. He taught at New York University Institute on Federal Taxation and wrote a number of articles on taxation. He was a benefactor and trustee of Yeshiva University and served on the boards of many businesses and private foundations.

H. Ober Hess '36 of Gladwyne, Pa., died Feb. 18, 2004. He was a partner and later senior counsel at Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll in Philadelphia, where he served as chairman from 1973 to 1981. He was the editor, since 1941, of the Fiduciary Review, a monthly law journal, and he edited "The Nature of a humane society: a symposium on the Bicentennial of the United States of America." He served on many civic and cultural boards and was a trustee of the Philadelphia College of Art.

Leonard Kaplan '36 of Cambridge, Mass., died Oct. 11, 2003. For more than five decades he worked for Nutter McClennen & Fish in Boston, retiring as a senior partner in 1987. He was also a special assistant attorney general in the charities division of the state attorney general's office. He was president of three local Jewish organizations and served as vice president of the National Jewish Welfare Board. He was honored by the American Jewish Committee and the Lena Park Community Development Corp. for his community service. An overseer of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he was a cello player and participated in the Harvard Music Association orchestra.

John Lansdale Jr. '36 of Harwood, Md., died Aug. 22, 2003. He was a longtime partner at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey in the Cleveland and Washington, D.C., offices and served in the U.S. Army as head of intelligence and security for the Manhattan Project during WWII. As part of the Alsos Mission prior to the end of the war, he was instrumental in locating and removing close to 1,100 tons of uranium ore in northern Germany, the products of a German atomic bomb project. As head of security for the Manhattan Project, he approved security clearance for physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, leader of the scientific team for the atomic bomb project, and later defended that decision during congressional hearings of the McCarthy era. He attained the rank of colonel and subsequently was awarded the Legion of Merit and the Order of the British Empire, Degree 4 Commander.

Bernard Roberts '36 of Lake Worth, Fla., died Nov. 22, 2003. Formerly of Palm Beach, Fla., and Newton, Mass., he was an attorney, real estate developer, investor, civic leader and philanthropist. He was president of Roberts Brothers Realtors, developing apartment complexes and commercial properties in the Greater Boston area. He was also a director of a number of companies, associations and hospitals.

Walter F. Sloan '36 of Rye, N.Y., died Aug. 5, 2003. Formerly of Bronxville, he was general tax counsel for Caltex, a petroleum corporation. He was a member of the Bronxville Field Club and secretary of the board of governors for the Siwanoy Country Club. During WWII, he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Naval Reserve in the Mediterranean.

Stanley W. Osgood '36-'37 of Winchester, Mass., died Nov. 12, 2003. He was a senior test editor for Houghton Mifflin and worked closely with author Robert L. Thorndike, helping to shape the Lorge-Thorndike Intelligence Tests and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales. Earlier in his career, he sold insurance for Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. During WWII, he worked for the U.S. Naval Electronics Laboratory.

Richard M. Root '36-'37 of Des Moines, Iowa, died Aug. 21, 2003. He practiced law in Des Moines and was a trust officer at Brenton Bank from 1967 until his retirement. He previously lived in Paris, where he was an employee of the U.S. government. Supporters of liberal arts education, he and his wife funded trusts at several universities and colleges in Iowa. He was a charter member of the Iowa Wine Advisory Board and a 33-year member of the Sertoma Club of Des Moines. He served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1953, attaining the rank of captain.

Samuel Duker '37 of Clifton, N.J., died Dec. 18, 2003. A sole practitioner, he specialized in labor relations. He retired from the practice of law in 1975 and spent half of his time in Jerusalem.

Owen Jameson '37 of San Francisco died Oct. 20, 2003. A corporate lawyer, he practiced his entire career at McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen, now known as Bingham McCutchen, where he was managing partner for 20 years. He was a longtime member of the Pacific-Union Club and served as president from 1972 to 1973. He helped raise funds for Saint Francis Memorial Hospital, Opportunities for the Blind and the University of California, San Francisco. During WWII, he was an attorney representing the Office of Price Administration and the Manhattan Project.

Monroe Kroll '37 of San Francisco died March 20, 2002. For 35 years, he was an immigration judge for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service in San Francisco. He was an honorary member of the San Francisco chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and an officer and board member of Congregation Sherith Israel in San Francisco.

John Eris Powell '37 of Chevy Chase, Md., died Oct. 15, 2003. A Washington, D.C., trial attorney, he specialized in corporate, estate and probate law. As a partner at Drury, Lynham and Powell, he represented the Washington Baseball Club and Washington Senators owner Calvin Griffith. He was general counsel to National Savings and Trust Bank. In the 1950s, he taught estate law and the history of English law at Georgetown University. A member of many professional organizations, he was president of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, the Barristers and the John Carroll Society. He was also president of the Archdiocesan Board of Education in Washington, D.C. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, attaining the rank of lieutenant commander.

Edward F. Connor '37-'38 of Hingham, Mass., died Jan. 17, 2004. He was a sole practitioner in Hingham and previously worked for the Federal Aviation Agency, now known as the Federal Aviation Administration. He represented the agency during the 1950s, when it expanded airports across New England.

Nathaniel L. Berger '38 of Pompano Beach, Fla., died April 17, 2002. He was president of Nat Berger Securities Corp.

Roland Gray Jr. '38 of Hobe Sound, Fla., died Feb. 4, 2004.

Harry P. Letton Jr. LL.M. '38 of San Marino, Calif., died Oct. 29, 2002. He was president and chief executive of Southern California Gas Co. He served as president of Los Angeles Town Hall, vice president of the Greater Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, a director of Independent Colleges of Southern California and chairman of American Gas Association and Pacific Coast Gas Association. During WWII, he was a communications officer in the U.S. Navy.

Edwin J. Putzell Jr. '38 of Naples, Fla., died Dec. 23, 2003. He was mayor of Naples from 1986 to 1990. In 1937, he joined Donovan, Leisure, Newton and Lumbard and helped Bill Donovan set up the Office of Strategic Services, the precursor of the CIA. During WWII, he was an executive officer of the Office of Strategic Services, and in late 1943, he played a part in a plot to capture Adolf Hitler while Hitler was on a yacht out at sea. After 1945, he joined Monsanto Co. in St. Louis as general counsel and vice president, and he later served as senior partner at Coburn, Croft & Putzell in St. Louis. He was vice chairman of the St. Louis County Board of Police Commissioners and president of the St. Louis Social Planning Council. He moved to Naples in 1979 and was chairman of the Naples Airport Authority before being elected mayor. After his mayoral term, he served on a number of civic boards in Collier County and was awarded the Naples Daily News Outstanding Citizen Award in 1995.

Ray W. Richardson Jr. '38 of Jacksonville, Fla., died Aug. 21, 2003. A founding partner of Freeman, Richardson and Watson in Jacksonville, he specialized in corporate law and insurance and lectured on corporation law at state bar seminars. He was president and honorary director of Florida Georgia Blood Alliance, a director of Voyager Group and president of Duval County Legal Aid Association. Active in the Florida and American bar associations, he was commended for his efforts in expanding legal aid programs within the state in the 1949 annual report of the ABA president. During WWII, he was a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

Norbert Lee Anschuetz '39 of Washington, D.C., died Oct. 15, 2003. He was a Citibank executive specializing in foreign affairs and served in the Foreign Service for 22 years. At Citibank, he was vice president for international affairs in New York and director of Citicorp's international development organization in London. During his time in the Foreign Service, he served in Athens, Greece, and Bangkok, Thailand. He was a minister counselor in Cairo, Egypt, shortly after the Suez Crisis and in Paris during Charles de Gaulle's presidency. In 1968, he retired from the Foreign Service. He was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. During WWII, he served in the Judge Advocate General's Corps in Austria.

Milton I. Goldstein '39 of St. Louis died Dec. 7, 2003. He co-founded Goldstein and Price in St. Louis in the mid-1950s and specialized in admiralty law. He previously practiced with Green, Hennings and Henry. Active in the Jewish community and in civil liberty causes, he was president of the board of trustees of St. Louis Jewish Light, a weekly community newspaper; president of the Jewish Community Relations Council of St. Louis; and vice chairman of the National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council. During the late 1950s, he headed a lecture series sponsored by the Jewish Community Center called the Liberal Forum, which hosted Eleanor Roosevelt and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. From 1942 to 1945, he was a lieutenant in the U.S. Coast Guard.

Emil Oxfeld '39 of South Orange, N.J., died July 20, 2003. A civil libertarian and labor lawyer, he represented workers and unions, including the New Jersey Education Association. He worked on cases involving loyalty oaths, prayer in school, McCarthyism and unconstitutional excesses of congressional committees. In 1960, he founded the New Jersey chapter of the ACLU, and he served as its president for 25 years. In 2000, the National Staff Organization presented him with the first Emil Oxfeld Advocacy Award.

Robert Lorne Stanfield Q.C. '39 of Ottawa died Dec. 16, 2003. He was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada and served as premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was chosen as his party's national leader in 1967 and entered the House of Commons. After losing to Pierre Trudeau in the 1974 elections, he stepped down as head of the party. He was often referred to as "the greatest prime minister Canada never had."

Winthrop B. Walker '39 of Harrisville, N.H., died Dec. 30, 2003. Formerly of Lincoln, Mass., he was a vice president for State Street Bank in Boston and a director or trustee of a number of civic organizations.

Philip C. Seminara '39-'40 of Pasadena, Calif., died Dec. 10, 2003.

1940-1949

Arthur L. Adamson '40 of Rumson, N.J., died Feb. 2, 2004. He was executive vice president and later president of Electronics Associates, a company he founded with the Signal Corps team he served with during WWII. He was president of the Rumson Board of Education during the 1950s and 1960s. A sailor, he was commodore of the Shrewsbury Sailing and Yacht Club and for many years raced his yacht, Wing II, one of the first Cal 40 racing sloops on the East Coast. He was a founding member of Polly's Pond Sailing Association and a founder of Wayside Skeet Club. He won the state skeet shooting championship in 1964.

Raymond L. Brittenham '40 of New York City died Nov. 14, 2003. He was a director of the French Institute Alliance Franaise and senior vice president, general counsel and director of International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., where he worked for 25 years. He later joined Lazard Freres as a consultant in investment banking and was vice president of the Tinker Foundation, both in New York City. A major in the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services during WWII, he received a Bronze Star, the French Croix de Guerre and the Belgian Chevalier de l'Ordre de Léopold.

Robert E. Long '40 of Burlington, N.C., died Feb. 18, 2003. He practiced law in Burlington beginning in 1952 and was a director of Aeroglide Corp. of Raleigh. He was president of the Burlington Rotary Club and was named a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow. Early in his career, he practiced in Roxboro, N.C., before serving as administrative assistant to Sen. Willis Smith in Washington, D.C., and later as an assistant U.S. attorney in Raleigh. He served in the U.S. Army during WWII.

Howard Meyers '40 of Washington, D.C., died Feb. 6, 2004. He worked on international security and atomic energy issues as a Foreign Service officer posted in London, Brussels, Tokyo and Washington, D.C. He was staff director of the Presidential General Advisory Committee on Arms Control and Disarmament and, from 1974 to 1977, was special assistant to the director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. After retiring from the Foreign Service in 1977, he worked at the U.S. State Department, helping to establish its centralized document declassification system. A founding member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, he was also a governor of Diplomatic and Consular Officers and a trustee of the DACOR-Bacon House Foundation. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps in New Guinea, the Philippine Islands and Japan.

Edward M. Rothstein '40 of Lakewood, N.J., died Oct. 24, 2002. He was a member of Rothstein, Mandell, Strohm, Must & Gertner in Lakewood, where he practiced real estate and trusts and estates law. He was assistant Ocean County counsel for 10 years and was township attorney for Lakewood Township and Lakewood Board of Education. From 1942 to 1946, he served in the U.S. Army.

John A. Swainbank '40 of St. Johnsbury, Vt., died Jan. 18, 2004. A longtime St. Johnsbury attorney, he practiced law for 53 years and helped found Swainbank, Morrissette and Neylon in 1949. A St. Johnsbury selectman, town agent and town attorney, he helped found and directed the Community School for the Handicapped and Caledonia Home Health. He served in the U.S. Navy as a communications officer in the Pacific during WWII.

Alfred E. Kenrick Jr. '40-'41 of Isle of Palms, S.C., died Jan. 30, 2003.

Herbert Y.C. Choy '41 of Honolulu died March 10, 2004. He was a senior judge of the Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. Appointed to the bench in 1971 by President Nixon, he was the first Asian-American to be appointed to a federal court. Earlier in his career, he practiced law in Honolulu and served a term as attorney general of the Territory of Hawaii. He enlisted in the U.S. Army after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He served as a judge advocate general, learned Japanese and was instrumental in writing a new constitution for Japan after the war.

Whitfield J. Collins LL.M. '41 of Fort Worth, Texas, died Nov. 24, 2003. A partner at Cantey & Hanger in Fort Worth, he practiced tax and estate law at the firm for 54 years. He served on the boards of many corporate and cultural institutions, including the Fort Worth Opera, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, Van Cliburn Foundation and Modern Art Museum. In 1995, he received the Blackstone Award, the highest honor of the Tarrant County Bar Association, and in 2001, he received an award from the All Saints Foundation for outstanding health care philanthropy. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant commander and an aide to Fleet Admirals Ernest J. King and Chester Nimitz.

Ramon de Murias '41 of Babylon, N.Y., died Jan. 28, 2004. He was vice president of international affairs for Braniff Airways and Pan American-Grace Airways and a director and board chairman of Southside Hospital. He wrote "The Economic Regulation of International Air Transport." During WWII, he served as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy.

Arnold M. Gordon '41 of Niskayuna, N.Y., died Oct. 29, 2003. A member and later senior counsel at Gordon, Siegel, Mastro, Mullaney, Gordon & Galvin, now in Latham, N.Y., he practiced law for more than 50 years and was a noted trial attorney in New York's Capital Region. He lectured on trial advocacy and was president of the Schenectady County Bar Association. A major in the U.S. Army during WWII, he was awarded the Bronze Star.

Willburt D. Ham LL.M. '41 of Lexington, Ky., died Dec. 8, 2003. A professor emeritus at the University of Kentucky College of Law since 1986, he had taught at the school since 1949. In 2003, he was inducted into the university's College of Law Alumni Association Hall of Fame. He was previously a visiting professor at Southern Methodist University School of Law and the University of Louisville School of Law. He was a director of the University of Kentucky Research Foundation and a member of the Kentucky Securities Advisory Committee.

Leonard B. Thomas '41 of Aurora, N.Y., died June 17, 2003. Formerly of Sennett, he was an entrepreneur, philanthropist and nationally recognized thoroughbred horse breeder. He owned Lime Ledge Farm in Sennett, and his horses won many races at Finger Lakes Race Track in Farmington. Earlier in his career, he was an attorney in New York City and worked for several years for Pfizer Pharmaceutical Co.

Arnold L. Veague '41 of Bangor, Maine, and Cocoa Beach, Fla., died May 26, 2003. He was a partner at Eaton, Peabody, Bradford & Veague, now Eaton Peabody in Bangor, where he worked for 40 years. Active in the Bangor community, he was a member of the city council and served as council chairman in 1955. He was a trustee of the Northern Conservatory of Music, Castine Community Hospital and the Bangor Savings Bank and was president of the Penobscot County Bar Association and the New England Bar Association. He was an expert trap shooter and received a number of trophies for his marksmanship. During WWII, he served with the U.S. Army's 88th Infantry's "Blue Devils," in North Africa and Italy.

Anthony P. Alfino '42 of Gainesville, Fla., died June 22, 2003. Formerly of Vero Beach and St. Louis, he was a senior labor counsel at General Dynamics Corp. in Clayton, Mo., for 21 years, specializing in equal employment opportunity. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during WWII.

Robert R. Cotten II '42 of Binghamton, N.Y., died Dec. 30, 2003. He taught English, history and economics at Broome Community College and business law at Triple Cities College from 1948 to 1949. Active in local politics, he served as Binghamton city counsel and was instrumental in establishing Binghamton's first public housing complex.

Hugh Gregg '42 of Nashua, N.H., died Sept. 24, 2003. He was a lawyer and businessman, and he served as governor of New Hampshire from 1953 to 1955. A GOP activist and champion of the presidential primary, he was the state's Republican National Committeeman and a member of the state Ballot Law Commission. In 1997, he was named to a special New Hampshire-Iowa commission to preserve the New Hampshire primary and Iowa presidential caucuses. He wrote two books on the New Hampshire presidential primary and one book claiming New Hampshire as the official birthplace of the Republican Party in October 1853. During his career, he practiced at the law firm Sullivan & Gregg and was treasurer and later president of the family millwork firm, Gregg & Son Inc. In 1947, he was elected alderman-at-large in Nashua before becoming mayor in 1950. He served as a special agent with the U.S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps during WWII and the Korean War and was a counterintelligence instructor at Fort Holabird, Md.

Philip M. Hanft '42 of Tucson, Ariz., died April 13, 2002. Formerly of Duluth, Minn., he was a senior partner of Hanft Fride in Duluth, where he represented mining interests in the Iron Range of northern Minnesota. He was active in civic affairs in Duluth, was a board member of the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center in Tucson and was a veteran of WWII.

John J. Rhodes '42 of Mesa, Ariz., died Aug. 24, 2003. For 30 years, he was an Arizona congressman, the first Republican elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Arizona. He was house minority leader in 1974 when he visited President Richard Nixon with Sens. Barry Goldwater and Hugh Scott on Aug. 7, advising Nixon to resign. Nixon resigned the presidency on Aug. 9. He served nine years as minority leader and worked to win approval for the Central Arizona Project, a large canal system that brought Colorado River water to central and southern Arizona. He headed the GOP National Conventions in 1976 and 1980. After leaving Congress in 1983, he practiced in the Washington, D.C., office of Hunton & Williams. In July 2003, he was awarded the first Congressional Distinguished Service Award. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces as an administrative officer stationed in Arizona during WWII.

James F. Stern '42 of Longboat Key, Fla., died March 19, 2004. Formerly of Milwaukee, he was an attorney and CEO of Great Lakes Biochemical Co. A member of the British Philatelic Society and the American Philatelic Congress, he received several awards for his stamp collections. He wrote "Swimming Pools and the Law." During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant.

Melville Chapin '43 of Cambridge, Mass., died March 9, 2004. A longtime corporate lawyer, he was of counsel at Kirkpatrick and Lockhart in Boston. He began his career at Warner and Stackpole in Boston, which later merged with Kirkpatrick and Lockhart. A trustee for many organizations, he served for 50 years as a trustee for the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and helped raise over $12 million for the performing arts center at Phillips Academy. During WWII, he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy.

Jack H. Fisher '45 of Kalamazoo, Mich., died March 31, 2003. He was a sole practitioner specializing in estate planning, probate, personal injury and corporate law. He was a director of the Kalamazoo County Bar Association and the Legal Aid Bureau. He published over 200 articles on numismatics and syngraphics and was elected to the Numismatic Literary Guild for original research.

Duncan Longcope '45-'47 of Boston and Lee, Mass., died Dec. 23, 2003. A writer and artist, he was on the staff of The New Yorker and lived in Paris in the 1960s. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army.

William H. Witt '45-'47 of Mitchellville, Md., died Oct. 24, 2003. A longtime resident of Bethesda, he worked for the Foreign Service for 30 years, serving as a political affairs officer and teaching courses in international law at National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. In the 1960s, he was a political counselor to the U.S. Embassy in South Africa and then a senior official in the U.S. State Department's Bureau of African Affairs in Washington. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

Laurence A. Tisch '46-'47 of New York City died Nov. 15, 2003. A Wall Street investor and media mogul, he co-founded Loews Corp. and was chairman, president and CEO of CBS Inc. He was a trustee of the Whitney Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the New York Public Library and president of the United Jewish Appeal of New York. As chairman of the board of trustees of New York University from 1978 to 1998, he helped raise almost $2 billion for the university, including more than $40 million from his family's donations. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army, Office of Strategic Services.

Robert E. Bingham '47 of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, died June 25, 2003. He practiced law for 50 years, was a councilman in Shaker Heights and served on more than 20 civic boards, including as president of the Cleveland Mental Health Association, the Cleveland Church Federation and the Cleveland Health Museum. For 30 years, he practiced corporate law, and he later did estate planning and probate work at Thomson Hine in Cleveland before joining Spieth Bell McCurdy and Newell. After retiring from Spieth Bell in 1989, he helped establish offices for Columbus-based Porter Wright Morris & Arthur in Cleveland and Naples, Fla. A golfer, he was the Mayfield Country Club champion seven times and runner-up eight times. During WWII, he served as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Navy, stationed at Adm. Chester Nimitz's headquarters at Pearl Harbor.

George M. Cheston '47 of Philadelphia died Oct. 15, 2003. He was an officer of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association, trustee of the Philadelphia Zoological Society and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and a director of the American Federation of the Arts.

Arthur H. Healey '47 of New Haven, Conn., died July 25, 2003. He was an associate justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court from 1979 to 1990 and later served as a state trial referee. He was appointed to the Connecticut Court of Common Pleas in 1961 and the Superior Court in 1965, where he served as chief judge from 1977 to 1978. Earlier in his career, he was a three-term senator of Connecticut, rising to majority leader in 1959. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army.

J. Frederick Hoffman '47 of Lafayette, Ind., and Sonoita, Ariz., died Oct. 20, 2003. He was a senior and founding partner of Hoffman, Luhman & Masson in Lafayette. He served as Tippecanoe County attorney from 1971 to 1982 and again from 1995 to 1997. A fellow of the Indiana Bar Foundation, he served as president of the Tippecanoe County Bar Association and the Legal Aid Corporation of Tippecanoe County. He received the Indiana State Bar Association's Pro Bono Publico award and was named a Sagamore of the Wabash by Indiana Gov. Frank O'Bannon for his work in civic affairs.

C. Bedford Johnson '47 of Hanover, N.H., died Dec. 6, 2003. A longtime resident of Bedford and Mt. Kisco, N.Y., he spent his career with Shearman & Sterling in New York City, where he was a partner and legal adviser to Citicorp. He was a director of many companies, including Fuji Bank. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during WWII, was wounded at Iwo Jima, and received a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart.

Charles J. Kickham Jr. '47 of Brookline, Mass., died Dec. 27, 2003. He practiced law in Brookline for more than 55 years, forming Kickham Law Offices in 1948. He served three times as president of the state bar association and was on the board of governors for the HLSA of Massachusetts. He was a graduate of Holy Cross, and the faculty lounge in the school's religion department is named in his honor. In 1942, he joined the U.S. Navy and served in the Philippines during WWII.

Marshall A. Levin '47 of Baltimore died Feb. 1, 2004. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge, he was named to the bench in 1971 and continued to hear cases until two weeks before his death. In 1992, he presided over a historic asbestos-injury case, the nation's largest mass trial, consolidating pending asbestos claims from Baltimore and several Maryland counties. The case included 8,600 plaintiffs, 14 defendants, 40 lawyers and more than 7 million documents. During WWII, he was a lieutenant in naval communications in Europe.

Edward C. Maher '47 of Shrewsbury, Mass., died Feb. 3, 2004. Formerly of Worcester and Osterville, he was an attorney in Worcester for 55 years and was president, chairman of the board and CEO of Home Federal Savings and Loan Association. A senior partner at Maher, McCann and Talcott until 1975, he later served as of counsel with Phillips, Silver, Talman, Aframe and Sinrich. He was active in local politics and, in the late 1940s and early 1950s, was local secretary to Congressman John F. Kennedy. For 40 years, he served on various public commissions and authorities, and he was the longest-serving member of the Massachusetts Port Authority. During WWII, he was a captain in the U.S. Army.

Gilbert Siegal '47 of Hartsdale, N.Y., died March 9, 2004. An attorney for over 50 years, he was the Greenburgh, N.Y., urban renewal commissioner and housing commissioner and president of the Hartsdale Civic Association. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during WWII and was awarded two Distinguished Flying Crosses, two Conspicuous Service Crosses, four Oak Leaf Clusters and numerous air and marksmanship medals.

Ralph O. Winger '47 of New York City died Sept. 25, 2003. He was a senior tax partner at Cahill Gordon & Reindel in New York City. He joined the firm in 1947 and was a partner for more than 30 years before retiring in 1991 and becoming senior counsel to the firm.

Richard M. Wyman '47 of Lexington, Mass., died May 17, 2003. He was a partner at Wyman & Gulick in Boston.

William J. Brick Jr. '47-'48 of Portsmouth, N.H., died Dec. 26, 2003. He was a financial control analyst for the Massachusetts Department of Welfare in Springfield. He published a number of short stories and essays. During WWII, he served as a bombardier in the 815th Bomber Squadron. His plane was shot down over Austria, and he was a prisoner of war in Germany.

Irwin W. Barkan '48 of Columbus, Ohio, and Fort Myers, Fla., died June 19, 2003. He practiced law for 41 years and was the founding partner of the firms Barkan & Barkan and Barkan & Neff. In Columbus, he was a Franklin County councilman and a founder of Alvis House, a halfway house for released prisoners. He participated in the Great Books program with the state penitentiary and was a member of the Legal Redress Committee of the NAACP. After retiring to Florida, he was an attorney emeritus with the Florida Rural Legal Services and the Lee County Sheriff's Association and was a founding promoter of the Quality Life Program in Fort Myers. He served in the U.S. military during WWII.

Edward T. Butler '48 of La Jolla, Calif., and Yuma, Ariz., died Dec. 24, 2003. He served on the San Diego County Superior Court and was an associate justice on the Court of Appeal, 4th District from 1982 to 1988. After retiring, he worked with a private mediation service. In 2000, his civic contributions were recognized by the deputy-mayor, who proclaimed Feb. 7 Edward T. Butler Day in San Diego. Earlier in his career, he was senior vice president of Electro Instruments, was appointed city attorney of San Diego in 1964, practiced at Schall, Butler, Boudreau & Gore and was a candidate for mayor of San Diego in 1971. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific theater during WWII. He received the Bronze Star for service at Guadalcanal and was honorably discharged with the rank of major. He returned to the Marines as a legal officer during the Korean War and became a lieutenant colonel at the age of 31.

Thomas J. Carens '48 of Wellesley, Mass., died Nov. 28, 2003. A senior partner at Roche, Carens & DeGiacomo in Boston, he began his career with the firm in 1948 when it was known as McGuire & Roche. He practiced civil and real estate law and was a member of the Massachusetts Conveyancers Association, the town of Wellesley's Permanent Building Committee and the Harvard Club of Boston. He was president of the Clover Club of Boston in 1981. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during WWII.

John L. Casey '48 of Quogue, N.Y., died Feb. 9, 2004. A managing director at Scudder, Stevens & Clark, he worked at the investment firm for over 30 years. He published two business ethics books, "Ethics in the Financial Marketplace" and "Values Added," and was the first executive fellow at the Bentley College Center for Business Ethics. He was also president and chairman of the board of trustees of Saint David's School in New York. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII.

Kendall M. Cole '48 of Naples, Fla., died Sept. 28, 2003. He was vice president and general counsel for Eastman Kodak Co. and General Foods Corp., and was a director of several organizations, including Fleet Bank and Allendale Columbia School, a college preparatory day school in Rochester, N.Y. During WWII, he served in the Pacific theater.

William C. Cramer '48 of St. Petersburg, Fla., died Oct. 18, 2003. Elected to Congress in 1954, he was the first Republican to win a congressional seat from Florida since Reconstruction. He served eight terms in the House and was the ranking Republican on the House Public Works Committee during his fifth term. In 1964, he became vice chairman to Gerald R. Ford on the Republican Conference. He surrendered his seat in 1970 after an unsuccessful run for U.S. Senate. He later practiced law in Washington, D.C., and Pinellas County, Fla. From 1952 to 1984, he served as a delegate or alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention. Earlier in his career, he was city attorney in Pinellas Park, was Pinellas County attorney and served in the Florida House of Representatives. During WWII, he served as a lieutenant aboard the USS Omaha. He participated in the invasion of southern France.

Robert B. Kittredge '48 of Cumberland Foreside, Maine, died Jan. 20, 2004. Formerly of Winchester, Mass., he was longtime chief legal counsel for the investment law firm of Loomis, Sayles & Co. He also was president of the company's mutual funds and served on the governing boards of both the mutual fund and investment counsel trade associations. For several years, he was president and chairman of the Investment Counsel Association of America. He previously practiced at Ely Bartlett. During WWII, he served as a commanding officer of a minesweeper in the Panama Canal.

F. Benjamin MacKinnon '48 of Sanibel, Fla., died April 29, 2003.

William S. Marshall '48 of Miami died Sept. 8, 2003. He practiced corporate law in Miami at the Law Offices of William S. Marshall.

John H. Montgomery Jr. '48 of Edgartown, Mass., died July 16, 2003. An international aviation lawyer in New York City for 20 years, he moved to Martha's Vineyard in 1969 and was a sole practitioner, focusing on probate and real estate law.

Paul Cushing Sheeline '48 of Lloyd Harbor, N.Y., died Aug. 6, 2003. He was chairman and CEO of Intercontinental Hotels Corp. in New York City and of counsel to Verner, Liipfert, Bernhard, McPherson & Hand in Washington, D.C. A director of Pan Am Corp. and National Westminster Bank, U.S.A., he was also a member of President Ronald Reagan's Board of Advisors on Private Sector Initiative. He was a trustee of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City and the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces and received the Silver Star, the French Legion of Honor and the Croix de Guerre with Palm Leaf. He was a co-founder and trustee of the Battle of Normandy Foundation.

Nathaniel B. Taft '48 of White Plains, N.Y., died Jan. 11, 2004. A lifelong resident of Westchester, N.Y., he was a sole practitioner in New York, specializing in health care and life insurance regulation. He previously worked for New York Life Insurance Co., heading several national and New York state group insurance industry task forces. After 22 years with the company, he retired as group vice president. He was active in his community and was president of the Westchester Philharmonic from 2001 to 2002. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army.

Dow Votaw '48 of La Selva Beach, Calif., died March 29, 2004. A former dean and professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley's Haas School of Business, he was known for his groundbreaking work on corporations and social responsibility. He joined UC Berkeley's business school as an instructor in 1948. Named a professor in 1959, he began teaching a course on the political, legal and social environment of business with Earl F. Cheit. Their work was the foundation for the Business and Public Policy Group at the school, a group Votaw chaired from 1972 to 1980. He wrote and edited books on business and public policy, including "Legal Aspects of Business Administration" and "The Corporate Dilemma." During WWII, he was a lieutenant and communications officer in the U.S. Navy.

Charles Biddle '48-'49 of Princeton, N.J., died Nov. 1, 2003. An executive with International Flavors & Fragrances in New York City, he joined the company as a management trainee in 1961 and went on to serve as area president of North America, Europe, Africa and Asia. He retired in 1985 as a corporate vice president. He served in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot and navigator.

Eugene E. Anderson Jr. '49 of Haverford, Pa., died Aug. 24, 2003. He was senior counsel for Penn Central Corp., where he specialized in real estate.

Mason L. Bohrer '49 of Winnetka, Ill., died Dec. 8, 2002. He practiced law mostly in Winnetka and Chicago until his retirement. In the 1970s, he taught at the John Marshall Law School in Chicago, and from 1957 to 1964, he practiced law in Missoula, Mont. He served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps in Australia and the Philippines during WWII.

James A. Brink '49 of New Castle, N.H., died Sept. 22, 2003. He was a partner at Hale and Dorr in Boston, specializing in estate planning and administration. A recovered alcoholic, he was co-founder of Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers, a statewide program designed to assist Massachusetts lawyers impaired as a result of alcoholism or substance abuse. He oversaw the employee assistance program and 12-step meetings at Hale and Dorr and was a member of the Supreme Judicial Court's Standing Committee on Substance Abuse. He also was vice chairman of the Board of Bar Overseers, and for nearly 20 years, he was president of the Social Law Library. During WWII and the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Navy as a submariner. From 1952 to 1965, he was active in the U.S. Naval Submarine Reserve.

Robert S. Burton '49 of Shaker Heights, Ohio, died Aug. 4, 2003. He joined what became Arter & Hadden after graduating from HLS and specialized in small corporations, contracts and estate planning. He retired as a partner in 1985. He was vice president of United Way, a board member of the Federation for Community Planning and chairman of the Shaker Heights Citizens Committee. His father was U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harold Hitz Burton '12. A Marine Corps fighter-bomber pilot, he flew 50 combat missions against Japanese forces in the Pacific. He also served as a reserve during the Korean War.

Rolf G. de Leuw '49 of St. Louis died Nov. 8, 2003. He was counsel and corporate secretary of the International Shoe Company in St. Louis. He and his wife were supporters of the Humane Society of Missouri, the Animal Protective Association of Missouri and the St. Louis Zoo. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army.

Edward A. Friend '49 of San Francisco died Aug. 31, 2003. A San Francisco litigator and sole practitioner, he practiced civil law for 53 years. He was a lifelong member of the English-Speaking Union, and he was fluent in Japanese; was conversant in French, German and Latin; and spoke some Russian and Korean. He was trained as an intelligence officer and mastered Japanese in the U.S. Army, where he served as a second lieutenant under Gen. Douglas MacArthur during the occupation of Japan. After graduating from HLS, he joined the U.S. Army Reserve, earning the rank of major and retiring in 1966.

Bertram Glovsky '49 of Beverly, Mass., died Jan. 3, 2004. For 53 years he was an attorney, practicing with his father and brother at Glovsky & Glovsky in Beverly. For the past few years, he was of counsel to MacLean Holloway Doherty Ardiff & Morse in Peabody. Active in the Beverly community, he was named a Paul Harris Fellow by the Beverly Rotary Club and received the Man of the Year Award from the Beverly B'nai B'rith. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

Morton Greenspan '49 of Metuchen, N.J., died Oct. 1, 2003. He was of counsel at Kroll & Tract in New York City. A member of the Executive Advisory Commission on Insurance Industry Regulatory Reform, he was also deputy superintendent and general counsel of the New York State Department of Insurance from 1975 to 1981.

Arthur D. Jackson '49 of Falls Village, Conn., died Feb. 10, 2003. He was vice president of U.S. Trust Company of New York City.

Arthur F. Koskinas '49 of Worcester and Osterville, Mass., died Nov. 3, 2003. An attorney for over 50 years, he was a partner at Koskinas and Langella in Worcester. He was president of Lincoln Ventures and senior partner at JEDCO Investments. Early in his career, he was an assistant city solicitor for the city of Worcester. He served on the board of the UMass Memorial Foundation, and in 2001, he and his wife endowed a professorship in biochemistry and molecular pharmacology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

John S. Macdougall Jr. '49 of Haverhill, Mass., died July 24, 2003. He was a justice of the Dukes County Probate and Family Court on Martha's Vineyard and an associate justice of Middlesex County Probate and Family Court in Cambridge. Earlier in his career, he worked at Holland, Johnson & Hays in Boston. He later became a partner at Soroka, McDonald, Davis & Macdougall in Haverhill. A fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he was also a trustee and finance committee member of the Pentucket Bank in Haverhill and a finance committee member of both Griffin White Home, a retirement community, and the First Congregational Church.

William B. Macomber Jr. '49 of Nantucket, Mass., died Nov. 19, 2003. He was a U.S. ambassador to Jordan and Turkey and president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. He worked in the U.S. State Department during five presidential administrations, beginning with Eisenhower's, and served as undersecretary for management from 1969 to 1973. Earlier in his career, he taught government at Boston University and spent two years with the CIA. He wrote "The Angels' Game: A Handbook of Modern Diplomacy." He was a founding member of the American Academy of Diplomacy, a trustee emeritus at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and a member of the board of overseers at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Marines, in the Office of Strategic Services, and twice parachuted into France to work with the French Underground.

Charles E. Pierson '49 of Akron, Ohio, died Nov. 18, 2003. A trial lawyer specializing in malpractice and product liability, he was a partner at Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs in Akron. Earlier in his career, he practiced at Herberich, Rowley, Taylor & Pierson. He was president of the Akron Bar Association and a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. He was president of the Akron Art Museum and the Torch Club and helped found and served as president of Friends of Hower House, a Victorian-era home. As president of the Summit County Historical Society, he worked to restore the Simon Perkins Mansion, a Greek Revival home built by the son of one of Akron's co-founders. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces as a B-29 crew member during WWII.

Seymour E. Podolsky '49 of Detroit died Jan. 26, 2004. He was a partner in his family's beer and wine wholesale business in Wyandotte, Mich. He was named to the Michigan Liquor Control Commission in 1991 and served as an administrative law judge and administrative commissioner until his retirement in 1999. He practiced law for four years before joining the family business. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces as a lieutenant in Australia and the Philippines.

James E. Quinn '49 of Newton, N.J., died Dec. 7, 2003. He was an attorney with Morris, Downing & Sherred in Newton and a superior court judge from 1977 to 1982. After retiring, he served as a municipal court judge for several New Jersey townships. He was the first chairman of Newton Housing Authority and president and board chairman of Newton Memorial Hospital, helping develop three expansion plans for the hospital over five decades. During WWII, he served four years as a captain in the U.S. Army Air Forces in the Pacific theater.

William V. Roth Jr. '49 of Wilmington, Del., died Dec. 13, 2003. A senator from Delaware, he served five terms in the U.S. Senate and created the retirement account known as the Roth IRA in 1997. A champion of tax cuts, he was chairman of the Finance and Governmental Affairs committees and oversaw inquiries into abuses by the Internal Revenue Service and Pentagon overspending. He wrote a book about the IRS in 1999, "The Power to Destroy." Prior to losing his seat for a sixth term, he was one of the longest-tenured politicians in Delaware's history and the state's longest-serving U.S. senator. He served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives beginning in 1966 before winning a seat in the Senate. During WWII, he served in a U.S. Army intelligence unit in the South Pacific and received the Bronze Star.

Edward M. Rothman '49 of Studio City, Calif., died July 20, 2003. An entertainment lawyer for 41 years, he was a longtime Universal Pictures executive and served as vice president of MCA Inc. He also held executive positions with 20th Century Fox and ZIV TV.

Edward L. Springer '49 of Coraopolis, Pa., died Sept. 19, 2003. He was a managing partner for Springer Bush & Perry in Pittsburgh.

N. Ferebee Taylor '49 of Chapel Hill, N.C., died Feb. 24, 2004. He was chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1972 to 1980. He practiced corporate law in New York City for almost two decades before joining the university as a visiting law professor in 1968. After his tenure as chancellor, he was a full-time law professor until 1991. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy.

Thomas W. Underhill '49 of West Chatham, Mass., died June 26, 2003.

Robert J. Ward '49 of New York City died Aug. 5, 2003. For more than 30 years, he was a federal judge for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, appointed to the court in 1972 by President Richard Nixon. He presided over nationally prominent lawsuits that included charges of illegal interference with abortion rights by the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue and accusations of plagiarism by the author of "Roots," Alex Haley. Previously, he was an assistant district attorney in Manhattan and an assistant U.S. attorney in the Southern District, where he was later chief of the civil division. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1944 to 1946.

Burton D. Wechsler '49 of Washington, D.C., died Jan. 19, 2004. He was professor emeritus at American University's Washington College of Law, where he taught constitutional law, federal courts and First Amendment law for 20 years. Honored as "Outstanding Teacher" for the college of law many times, he received the Outstanding Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching for the entire university in 1995. He previously taught at Antioch School of Law in Washington, D.C., and Valparaiso University School of Law in Indiana. A civil rights activist, he assisted with voter registration in Mississippi in 1964; was instrumental in the campaign of Richard Hatcher, the first African-American mayor of a major U.S. city; and was a founder of the Gary, Ind., chapter of the ACLU. During WWII, he served as an ensign in the U.S. Navy.

Philip L. Winter '49 of Jensen Beach, Fla., died June 24, 2003. Formerly of Larchmont, N.Y., he practiced with Bohan, Trask, Bohan & Winter in Larchmont for more than 30 years. He practiced entertainment law in New York City before moving his practice to Larchmont and later Estes Park, Colo. He served in the U.S. Army as a Japanese interpreter during WWII.

Walter E. O'Leary '49-'50 of Berkeley, Calif., died July 19, 2003. Formerly of White Plains, N.Y., he was an attorney in White Plains.

Charles F. Whittemore '49-'51 of Manchester, N.H., died Oct. 20, 2003. He was president and CEO of Catholic Medical Center in Manchester and a longtime public servant. He served as a school district moderator and chairman of the Municipal Budget Committee, and he was moderator for the town of Pembroke from 1972 to 1989. He was the first director for the Federal Housing Authority of New Hampshire from 1964 to 1967, before serving as New Hampshire's commissioner of health and welfare. He was president of the Manchester Historic Association and served in executive positions on the Havenwood-Heritage Heights Retirement Communities Trust Fund. Earlier in his career, he taught government and administration at a number of colleges and universities. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army.

Frederick B. Grill '49-'53 of New York City died Oct. 19, 2003. He had a general law practice in New York City.

1950-1959

William P. Everts Jr. '50 of Mill Valley, Calif., died Dec. 3, 2003. For 25 years he worked in the law department of U.S. Steel Corp. He also taught at San Francisco Law School and Hampton University. Earlier, he practiced at Johnson, Clapp, Ives & King in Boston and served with the Atomic Energy Commission in Richland, Wash. After retiring, he wrote a biography, "Stockwell of Minneapolis," on S.A. Stockwell, his maternal grandfather and a longtime member of the Minnesota state legislature. During WWII, he served with the Medical Administrative Corps in India and Burma.

Jerome J. Gelman '50 of Hackensack, N.J., died Jan. 12, 2004. Formerly of Teaneck and Paterson, N.J., he was an attorney with Gelman & Gelman in Elmwood Park for 50 years. He was president of the Paterson Rotary Club, trustee of the Botto House American Labor Museum and counsel member of the Order of the Golden Chain. He served in the U.S. Army during WWII.

William T. Munson '50 of Falmouth, Mass., died Sept. 28, 2003. A partner at Munson Lebherz & Turkington in Falmouth, he specialized in real estate and probate. He was chairman of the board of assessors in Falmouth and board of trustees of the Falmouth Public Library for 25 years. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces, attaining the rank of master sergeant.

Anthony P. Nugent Jr. '50 of Kansas City, Mo., died Dec. 23, 2003. He was a judge for the Missouri Court of Appeals, Western District. He unsuccessfully fought his mandatory retirement from the court at age 70 all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Previously, he served as assistant U.S. attorney in Kansas City. In the mid-1960s, he was with the appellate section of the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., and was a member of the attorney general's committee to review and evaluate the criticisms of the Warren Commission Report. During WWII, he was a medic in the U.S. Army and served in five campaigns in France and Germany. He was wounded in Normandy and again in the Battle of the Bulge and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart with oak leaf cluster.

George D. Reycraft '50 of Key Largo, Fla., died March 1, 2004. Formerly of Pelham Manor, N.Y., he was a longtime principal of Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft. He litigated complex corporate cases, including an investors' suit challenging the accounting practices of Arthur Andersen and an investors' complaint against Ivan F. Boesky and his main underwriter. Reycraft retired in 1994 as co-chairman of the firm and chairman of the litigation department and became vice chairman and later chairman of M.A. Schapiro & Co., a bank securities dealer. Earlier in his career, he was a trial lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice, rising to chief of the special trial section in 1958. The following year, he was the federal government's chief litigator in an antitrust confrontation with E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. and General Motors. He served as a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces during WWII and in the U.S. Air Force in the Korean War.

Palmer Smith '50 of Seattle died Feb. 11, 2004. For over 40 years he practiced law in Seattle as a partner at Cary, Durning, Prince & Smith and Smith, Brucker, Winn & Ehlert. He was later a sole practitioner. He worked on legislation prohibiting racial discrimination in housing in Seattle and Washington state, drafted the first abortion-rights legislation in Washington state in the late 1960s and served on a number of boards and committees related to fair housing, human services and civil rights. He studied Japanese and Malay languages in the U.S. Navy and served at the Joint Naval Intelligence Center.

Philip H. Suter '50 of Concord and Chatham, Mass., died Dec. 23, 2003. He practiced for four decades at Sullivan & Worcester in Boston, where he was a partner specializing in estate planning and administration. He was a Concord selectman from 1972 to 1978 and led the town's 1975 bicentennial celebration, helping organize the April 19 event attended by more than 110,000 people, including President Gerald R. Ford. He was a chairman of the town's planning board and zoning board of appeals, as well as a member of the boards of Concord Academy, the Concord Museum and Concord Friends of the Aging. During WWII, he was a field artillery platoon commander and served in the Office of Strategic Services.

David P. Templeton '50 of Lake Oswego, Ore., died July 2, 2003. He was a partner and later of counsel at Martin, Bischoff, Templeton, Langslet & Hoffman in Portland. He joined the firm 1958, practicing civil litigation until his retirement in the 1990s. He served in the U.S. Army during WWII with the 95th Infantry Division.

Ralph Stephen Carrigan '51 of Houston died Sept. 16, 2003. An attorney with Baker Botts in Houston, he joined the firm in 1951 and retired as a senior partner after 40 years there. He later joined his two sons in their respective Houston firms, Carrigan Lapin & Landa and Sydow & Carrigan, as of counsel. He was president of the Houston Bar Association and a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a second lieutenant.

Robert H. Gillespy II LL.M. '51 of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, died Jan. 28, 2004. He was a partner at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey in Cleveland.

Armand A. Korzenik '51 of Hartford, Conn., died July 17, 2003. A city official and a Hartford lawyer for 50 years, he was a longtime member of the Democratic town committee. He worked as an assistant corporation counsel and was a member of the Hartford Board of Education and the city's redevelopment agency. He also was a chairman of the Greater Hartford United Negro College Fund. A member of the Mount Moriah Baptist Church, he donated his legal services to the church for 40 years. He was a brigadier general with the Air National Guard and a colonel with the U.S. Air Force. He served in WWII and the Korean War.

George S. Leisure Jr. '51 of Sea Island, Ga., died Aug. 25, 2003. A courtroom litigator who worked in corporate and antitrust law, he was a longtime partner at Donovan, Leisure, Newton & Irvine in Manhattan. His clients included Howard Hughes, American Cyanamid and Walt Disney Co. Earlier in his career, he worked for the CIA, was an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York and was a trial lawyer in the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in New York City. He was president of the Federal Bar Council and a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy and again during the Korean War as a lieutenant on destroyers.

John P. Persons LL.M. '51 of Norfolk, Conn., and Vero Beach, Fla., died Jan. 29, 2004. Formerly of Scarsdale, N.Y., he practiced at Patterson, Belknap & Webb in New York City for over 40 years, focusing on general corporate law with a specialty in tax. He began his legal career in the chief counsel's office of the Internal Revenue Service in Washington, D.C. He was a trustee of the Shelburne Museum in Vermont, president of the Scarsdale Friends of the Parks and a longtime member of the Harvard Club of New York City.

Joseph H. Wishod '51 of Delray Beach, Fla., died Dec. 5, 2003. He practiced law with Cahn Wishod & Lamb in Melville, N.Y., and earlier with Wishod & Fisch in Manhattan. He served in the U.S. Merchant Marines from 1945 to 1946.

Avukat Yahya Muvaffak Kavrar '51-'52 of Mersin, Turkey, died Feb. 27, 2003.

William J. Kirby '52 of Forest Hills, N.Y., died Nov. 22, 2003. He was a partner at Sullivan & Cromwell in New York City. He retired in 1992 and was named senior counsel.

Leonard H. Monroe '52 of Burbank, Calif., died Aug. 16, 2003.

Roy H. Scharf '52 of Guilford, Conn., died Jan. 10, 2004. He practiced real estate law in Branford and was a member of the Connecticut Bar Association for 50 years. Since the mid-1960s, he concentrated his practice on representing real estate builders, developers, investors and mortgage companies. He was working toward a master's degree in urban planning at Southern Connecticut State University.

Alexander M. Vagliano '52 of Norfolk, Conn., died Nov. 13, 2003. An executive with J.P. Morgan & Co., he was involved in the negotiations for the return of American hostages from Iran, one of whom was his cousin, Moorhead Kennedy '58 ('59). As head of Morgan Guaranty Trust Company's international banking division, in 1981, he joined a group of bank executives who were negotiating the release of Iranian assets from American banks. Before joining J.P. Morgan, he worked at White & Case. In the 1980s, he received the rank of Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from the French government for his work promoting French-American culture.

Aram Jack Kevorkian '53 of Paris died Dec. 20, 2003. An American lawyer in Paris for more than 40 years, he wrote a monthly newsletter on the spirit of French law. He started "The Kevorkian Newsletter" in 1978 and eventually sent it to 3,000 people in 72 countries. A collection of his newsletters, "Confessions of a Francophile," was published in 2002. Early in his career, he worked on Wall Street for Dewey Ballantine. In 1966, he established his own law firm, advising international companies on business law. He served in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General's Corps.

Herbert Semmel '53 of Los Angeles died Feb. 5, 2004. A longtime civil rights attorney, he was founder and director of the Federal Rights Project of the National Senior Citizens Law Center in Los Angeles, where he worked for about 10 years. The Federal Rights Project has been renamed in his honor. He was previously director of the Center for Law and Social Policy in Washington, D.C., and litigation director of New York Lawyers for the Public Interest. He taught at seven law schools and wrote three books, including "New Approaches in the Law of Civil Procedure." Last year he received the Reginald Heber Smith Award from the National Legal Aid & Defender Association and the Felix A. Fishman Award for Public Service from New York Lawyers for the Public Interest.

John P. Dunn '54 of Chatham, Mass., died Sept. 15, 2003. A corporate, banking and estate planning attorney, he practiced law for nearly 50 years and was a founding partner of Dunn McGee & Allen in Worcester. For 13 years, he was town moderator for Shrewsbury. In 1962, he tried a labor law case before the U.S. Supreme Court. He began his career with Vaughn, Esty, Crotty & Mason, becoming senior partner of its successor firm. He was a trustee of Worcester Academy and a director of Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Worcester.

Andrew E. Norman '54 of Palisades, N.Y., died Feb. 7, 2004. A journalist, philanthropist and publisher, he served as a financier and consultant to HealthDay, a health news content provider to various media and health care organizations. He worked for the Newark News and Current magazine in the late 1950s and became part owner of Chelsea House Publishers in 1968. He and his wife, Helen Dwelle Davis, an artist and miniaturist, ran the Hudson River Dollhouse Co. He was involved with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union. He was also chairman of the Norman Foundation and a founding member of the National Network of Grantmakers, and he helped develop the Big Apple Circus and Rockland County Community College.

Donald E. Sanford Jr. '54 of Buffalo, N.Y., died Feb. 13, 2004. For 28 years, he was an estate and gift tax attorney for the Internal Revenue Service. Earlier in his career, he worked at Williams, Stevens & McCarville and in the trust department of Liberty Bank. He served in the U.S. Army in Germany for two years.

Robert M. Spaulding '54 of Buffalo, N.Y., died July 15, 2003. He was a longtime Buffalo-area attorney, specializing in bankruptcy law at Phillips, Lytle, Hitchcock, Blaine & Huber. Joining the firm after graduating from HLS, he led its commercial bankruptcy practice and served as chairman of its management and governing committees. He lectured on bankruptcy before the ABA and ALI and was listed in every edition of "The Best Lawyers in America" since its first publication.

Thomas D. Titsworth '54 of Carmel, Ind., died July 8, 2003. For 40 years, he practiced law with Bamberger & Feibleman in Indianapolis. He continued his law practice at Wooden & McLaughlin in Indianapolis and Campbell Kyle Proffitt in Carmel.

Edgar W. Bassick III '55 of Stratford, Conn., died Oct. 31, 2003. He was a Superior Court judge and a partner at Pullman & Comley in Bridgeport, where he specialized in family law. He was nominated to the court by former Gov. William O'Neill in 1986. He served in the U.S. Army from 1946 to 1948.

Daniel H. Kossow '55 of Armonk, N.Y., died March 15, 2004. He was an entertainment lawyer in New York City for many years and most recently had a law office in White Plains.

H. David Leventhal '55 of Hartford, Conn., died March 24, 2004. An attorney for 50 years, he practiced at Brown Raysman Millstein Felder & Steiner in Hartford. He was a fellow of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers and chairman of the real property section of the Connecticut Bar Association. He co-wrote "The Connecticut Common Interest Ownership Manual," published by the Connecticut Bar Association, and was a lecturer at the University of Connecticut School of Law.

Edward G. Bauer Jr. '57 of Boca Raton, Fla., died Oct. 1, 2003. He was a city solicitor for Philadelphia in the 1960s and general counsel for Philadelphia Electric Co., now Peco Energy Co., beginning in 1970. From 1978 to his retirement in 1988, he was senior vice president and general counsel at the company. He was also an attorney for the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. He served on Philadelphia's Bicentennial Commission and on the boards of the Defenders Association, the American Foundation for Negro Affairs and the American Heart Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania. During the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Air Force in San Antonio.

Charles C. Cabot Jr. '57 of Dover, Mass., died Sept. 9, 2003. He was of counsel at Sullivan & Worcester in Boston, where he practiced trust and estates and business law beginning in 1966. Previously, he practiced in the counsel's office of the U.S. Information Agency. Since 1970, he was a member of the Conservation Law Foundation, becoming a director in 1981 and chairman of the board of trustees in 1991. A trustee of Milton Academy and the Neighborhood House Charter School in Dorchester, Mass., he was also selectman for the town of Dover for many years. During WWII, he served in the U.S. Navy.

Charles S. Cohen '57 of Orleans, Mass., died Feb. 16, 2004. Formerly of Longmeadow, he practiced law in Springfield for 40 years, retiring from Egan, Flanagan and Cohen in the late 1990s. From 1975 to 1978, he served as a judge of the District Court of Springfield, and he was president of McKinstry Inc. in Chicopee for over 30 years. He was president of the Hampden County Bar Association, chairman of the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers and a member of the Judicial Nominating Council for Western Massachusetts.

Joseph T. Conlon Jr. '57 of Farmington, Mo., died Oct. 13, 2003. He was a professor emeritus at St. Louis University. He also taught at the University of Notre Dame and was a prosecuting attorney of Lincoln County, Mo. During the Korean War, he was a U.S. Army correspondent for The Stars and Stripes newspaper.

Herbert L. Spira '57 of Washington, D.C., died Sept. 9, 2003. He was tax counsel for the Independent Community Bankers of America and for the Subcommittee on International Development of the House Banking Committee. For 18 years, he was tax and chief counsel of the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. After retiring in 1998, he composed songbooks, including a "History of American Patriotic Songs" and "A Sentimental Journey Around Scotland in Poetry and Song."

Richard C. Torbert '57 of Philadelphia died Oct. 7, 2003. A longtime resident of Center City, Pa., he was vice president of Girard Bank in Philadelphia, where he worked for 27 years. He previously worked for Irving Trust Co. in New York. He helped found the Friends of the Free Library and, in the 1980s, helped develop the Mayor's Commission on Literacy and the Center for Literacy, all in Philadelphia. From 1951 to 1954, he served in the U.S. Air Force in Munich, Germany.

C. Robertson Trowbridge '57 of Peterborough, N.H., died Sept. 8, 2003. A state legislator and publisher of Yankee magazine, he joined the publication in 1964, was named president in 1970 and became chairman in 1989. When he joined the company, the publication's circulation was 100,000. Under his leadership, circulation increased to more than 1 million by the mid-1980s, and the company expanded from its two main publications, Yankee magazine and the Old Farmer's Almanac, to a multimillion-dollar publisher of business magazines, books and other periodicals. During his career, he served in both state legislative houses and was chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee. He was town moderator for Dublin, N.H., for 26 years, served on the boards of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and was a founder of the Trust for New Hampshire Lands.

Eudore J. Fontaine Jr. '58 of Wellesley, Mass., died Jan. 13, 2004. An artist, he painted Impressionist paintings of city scenes and depictions of Boston and Rhode Island landscapes. In 1996, he was commissioned by the Boston Athletic Association to design a lithograph to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Boston Marathon. He practiced law until the early 1970s, when he devoted himself to painting. He served as a communications officer in the U.S. Navy.

Laurence J. Hoch '58 of Hull, Mass., and Key Colony Beach, Fla., died June 18, 2003. He was an admiralty attorney at Hoch & McHugh in Boston and a commander in the U.S. Coast Guard, where he served for 25 years. He was a treasurer and director of the U.S. Coast Guard Foundation and in 1997 received the foundation's Distinguished Service Award. He also was an officer of the International Goodwill Foundation, president of the U.S. Navy League's Boston chapter, and a member of the Boston Marine Society and the Propeller Club of Boston.

Jeremiah Marsh '58 of Winnetka, Ill., died Jan. 19, 2004. An expert on Illinois state law and a partner at Ungaretti & Harris in Chicago since 2001, he was previously co-chairman of Hopkins & Sutter in Chicago. Earlier in his career, he was a legislative aide to Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy and later general counsel to Illinois Gov. Richard Ogilvie, helping to establish the Illinois income tax and redraft the state's constitution. He served on the National Commission on Uniform State Laws and on the board of overseers of the Chicago-Kent College of Law, Illinois Institute of Technology.

Philip E. Peterson LL.M. '58 of Lewiston, Idaho, died Dec. 29, 2003. A professor emeritus and dean at the University of Idaho College of Law, he joined the faculty in 1952, served as dean from 1961 to 1966 and retired in 1990. An expert on Idaho's tax law, he wrote many of Idaho's sales tax and income tax laws and co-wrote the Uniform Probate Code to standardize probate procedures between states. During WWII, he was a B-29 navigator with the U.S. Army Air Forces. He was involved in the fire bombing of Japan and helped provide transport for Chinese Nationalist leader Chiang Kai-shek. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Silver Star and Purple Heart. After the war, he remained in the Air Force Reserve, retiring as a lieutenant colonel in 1966.

Duane T. Sargisson '58 of Worcester, Mass., died Sept. 4, 2003. A partner at Bowditch & Dewey in Worcester, he was an expert in Massachusetts on the National Labor Relations Act and other federal and state labor laws. Beginning in 1964, he served two terms in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He was counsel for the University of Massachusetts Medical School and town counsel for the towns of Barre and Petersham. In the 1990s, he was on the governor's Judicial Nominating Council for Central Massachusetts. He was a trustee and president of the board of Worcester City Hospital and Worcester Academy. A member of a number of hereditary and patriotic societies, he served three terms as chancellor general of the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, receiving the organization's highest honor, the Minuteman Award. He served in the U.S. Army.

Mendel Small '58 of Overland Park, Kan., died Dec. 18, 2003. He was a partner at Spencer Fane Britt & Browne for over 25 years, specializing in bankruptcy law. He previously served as a general practitioner in Kansas City for 13 years. He wrote a chapter of the Missouri Bar Continuing Legal Education treatise on assignment for the benefit of creditors and received the 2003 Michael R. Roser Excellence in Bankruptcy Award from the Missouri Bar Association's commercial law committee. He was chairman of the Beth Shalom Cemetery committee and a member of the Jewish Community Relations Board.

Thomas L. Cantrell '59 of Dallas died Nov. 13, 2003. He practiced patent, trademark and copyright law as of counsel at Jenkens & Gilchrist in Dallas. He previously practiced at Johnson & Gibbs in Dallas.

1960-1969

Eugene G. Coombs Jr. '60 of Boston died Jan. 13, 2004. He practiced insurance law as a partner at Kilburn Casey Goscinak & Coombs in Boston.

Rudolph V. Lutter Jr. '60 of Washington, D.C., died Dec. 14, 2003. He taught communications law at Howard University School of Communications and was a senior attorney adviser to the Federal Communications Commission for 18 years. A member of the board of managers for the Overbrook School for the Blind in Philadelphia beginning in 1970, he was named a Distinguished Alumnus of the school.

Alexander M.S. McColl '60 of Boulder, Colo., died Oct. 23, 2002. He was a director of special projects for Omega Group, publishers of Soldier of Fortune magazine, and founder and president of Refugee Relief International, a nonprofit medical and relief agency. In the early 1970s, he was president of Humphrey-Stone-McColl Corp., a natural gas drilling and production business, and he later established an investment firm. Commissioned as a special agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps, he served four years in the U.S. Army before coming to HLS. After practicing law for three years, he returned to active duty and served two tours in Vietnam. He remained active in the U.S. Army Reserve Special Forces and retired as a full colonel, U.S. Army Reserve, in 1984. He wrote two novels based on his experience in Vietnam, "Valley of Peril" and "Maccat."

Theodore L. Tolles '60 of New Hartford, N.Y., died Feb. 7, 2004. A businessman and lawyer in New York City and Utica, N.Y., he worked for a number of companies before joining the law firm of Kowalczyk Tolles & Deery in 1991. He was active in local and state politics and served as a Democratic committeeman for the town of New Hartford, Oneida County and New York state. He was a trustee of Utica College and the House of Good Shepherd. He served in the U.S. Army from 1960 to 1961.

Sergius M. Boikan '61 of San Francisco died July 20, 2003. He was a sole practitioner in San Francisco, specializing in public utility law and transportation regulation.

Wesley B. Smith '61 of Ridgewood, N.J., died Feb. 5, 2004. Formerly of Rutherford and Succasunna, N.J., he worked at Smith & Ely in Rutherford. Early in his career, he worked at Dewey Ballantine.

Stuart D. Buchalter '62 of Los Angeles died Jan. 6, 2004. A corporate and securities attorney, he was of counsel at Buchalter Nemer Fields & Younger in Los Angeles, where he worked for 40 years. He served as the firm's managing partner during the 1970s and was co-chairman of its business practices group at the time of his death. He also taught securities regulation at the UCLA School of Law. He was a director on many corporate boards, including City National Corp. and the Warnaco Group. Early in his career, he served as special counsel to the Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C. He also served as chairman of the board of trustees of Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles and as president of the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Los Angeles.

David L. Fishman '64 of Belmont, Mass., died Feb. 14, 2004. A management consultant, he established a media and entertainment consulting practice at Arthur D. Little in the 1970s and was serving as its director and vice president when he left in 1994. He briefly worked at EDS/AT Kearney before forming his own firm, Centre Advisory Services, in Belmont. He wrote film scripts and was a board member of Visionaries, a nonprofit educational organization developing documentaries for social change, and the Kendall Center for the Arts in Belmont. Early in his career, he lived in London and supervised the production of low-budget films. He served in both the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force reserves.

William R. Carlson '66 of Gates Mills, Ohio, died July 25, 2003. An attorney, real estate agent and businessman, he sold real estate for the Smythe, Cramer Co. He previously practiced law, did business management consulting for McKinsey & Co. and was a principal in Technicare, a developer of medical diagnostic equipment. He was president of Mayfield Country Club's curling association in Cleveland.

J. Frank Osha '66 of McLean, Va., died Jan. 29, 2004. A patent lawyer, he was a senior partner at Sughrue Mion, an intellectual property firm in Washington, D.C. Earlier in his career, he worked as an IP counsel for Communications Satellite Corp. During the 1960s and 1970s, he sang with the Dupont Circle Consortium, and he once performed at the Kennedy Center with the Paul Hill Chorale.

Lyman R. Patterson S.J.D. '66 of Athens, Ga., died Nov. 5, 2003. A legal ethics and copyright professor for 45 years, his teaching career included stints at the law schools of Mercer, Vanderbilt and Emory universities. From 1986 to the fall of 2003, he was the Pope F. Brock Professor of Professional Responsibility at the University of Georgia School of Law. He was dean of Emory University School of Law from 1973 to 1980. He also served as special assistant attorney general of Georgia for copyright matters. For his HLS S.J.D. thesis, he wrote "Copyright in Historical Perspective." He also co-wrote "The Nature of Copyright" and wrote a casebook on legal ethics.

David A. Cathcart '67 of Pasadena, Calif., died Sept. 30, 2003. A labor and employment law specialist, he was a senior partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in Los Angeles. He left the firm in 1970 for two years to serve as chief legislative assistant to California Sen. John V. Tunney, helping draft the Water Quality Act. He served on the Management Advisory Committee of the National Labor Relations Board from 1994 to 1998, was the founding chairman of the American Employment Law Council and held leadership positions in the ABA. He was a senior editor of the "California Employment Litigation Practice Guide" and editor in chief of the "Five-Year Cumulative Supplement to Employment Discrimination Law." In 1996, he was elected a fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers. For 23 years, he was on the board of governors of the Santa Monica Boys & Girls Club, where the David A. Cathcart College Scholarship Fund has been established.

Stephen A.A. Goddard '68 of Honolulu died Dec. 31, 2003. He owned a yacht brokerage, The Yacht Connection, in Honolulu, beginning in 1990. He moved to Hawaii in 1985, after a career in law and business in Minneapolis and Austin, Texas.

Stuart R. Abelson '69 of Chicago died Oct. 22, 2003. He practiced poverty law in El Paso, Texas, and New York City before returning to Chicago and working in his family's business, Barton Brands. After the business was sold in 1982, he was an investment manager and adviser while pursuing his interests in photography and traveling.

Charles J. Beard II '69 of Lexington, Mass., died March 30, 2004. A nationally recognized authority on cable television regulation and business law, he worked at Foley, Hoag & Eliot in Boston for 30 years and was the first African-American to be named a partner by a major Boston law firm. Prior to joining the firm in 1974, he worked for the Boston Model City Administration. He served on a number of community and professional boards, including as a charter trustee of Phillips Academy in Andover and chairman of the board of trustees of WGBH. He was also a director of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts.

Jacob C. Diemert '69 of Acton, Mass., died Nov. 7, 2003. He served as Stow town counsel for 30 years and was a partner at Wilson & Orcutt of Acton since 1996. He began his career at Sherburne, Powers and Needham in Boston, where he was a partner for 20 years. A lecturer and writer on business and municipal subjects, including "Municipal Law" and "Massachusetts Handbook of Legal Research," he was president of the Waltham Rotary Club and the Concord Chamber of Commerce and was a board member of the Orchard House in Concord, the Acton Chamber of Commerce and the United Way of Acton. He also served as president of the Central Middlesex Bar Association in 1979 and 1980.

1970-1979

George B. Reid Jr. '74 of McLean, Va., died Oct. 3, 2003. He was a co-founder of Pitts Bay Partners, an advisory firm, and was chief executive of Bacardi Ltd. In 1974, he joined Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C., and he became a partner in 1982 and served as coordinator of the firm's corporate and securities practice group. He also served as Bacardi's legal adviser for 10 years and later helped to negotiate the company's acquisition of Martini & Rossi. In 1996, he joined Bacardi as executive vice president. In the 1980s, he was deputy counsel to the Republican National Committee, and he was a board member of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Aging and Geriatric Medicine. He served in the U.S. Army Reserve for 11 years.

Frank A. Rosenfeld '76 of Arlington, Va., died Sept. 29, 2003. Formerly of Squirrel Hill, he was a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division.

Jerome McCristal Culp Jr. '78 of Durham, N.C., died Feb. 5, 2004. For nearly 20 years, he was a professor at Duke University School of Law. He specialized in race and the law, law and economics, and labor economics issues. From 1989 to 1993, he was director of the John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics at the law school. He began his career with the Rockefeller Foundation in New York City, working on youth employment and affirmative action issues.

1980-1989

Henry N. Winters '81 of Franklin, Mich., died Aug. 7, 2003. He was a director at Ford Motor Co., Division of Corporate Finance, in Dearborn, Mich. He previously practiced in New York with the law firms of Cahill Gordon & Reindel and Shearman & Sterling.

Karin I. Henrikson '87 of Auburn, W.Va., died Aug. 30, 2003. She formerly lived in Canterbury, N.H.

1990-1999

Elizabeth R. Turner '90 of Dallas died Oct. 12, 2003. A partner at Hughes & Luce in Dallas, she joined the firm after graduating from HLS and specialized in estate planning and trusts. At HLS, she was president of the HLS Drama Society, and she later performed in several annual variety shows of the Dallas Bar Association. She was a fellow of both the Dallas Bar Foundation and the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. She was a volunteer for Altrusa International and Habitat for Humanity.