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Faculty Chair Lecture: October 19
 

Making Global Lawyers: Legal Education, Legal Practice, and the Paradox of Professional Distinctiveness

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Watch video of this event


David Wilkins
Vice Dean, Global Initiatives on the Legal Profession
Director, Program on the Legal Profession
Lester Kissel Professor of Law

On the occasion of his appointment as the Lester Kissel Professor of Law, David Wilkins, faculty director of the Program on the Legal Profession, gave a lecture entitled, “Making Global Lawyers: Legal Education, Legal Practice, and the Paradox of Professional Distinctiveness”.

Spotlight at Harvard Law School wrote this feature on Professor Wilkins's Chair Lecture:

Harvard Law School Professor David Wilkins ‘80 delivered a lecture, “Making Global Lawyers: Legal Education, Legal Paradox, and the Paradox of Professional Distinctiveness” on Oct. 19th to mark his appointment as the Lester Kissel Professor of Law.

HLS Dean Martha Minow introduced Wilkins, HLS’s first vice dean of global initiatives on the legal profession, noting: “The match between David Wilkins and the Lester Kissel professorship is really quite extraordinary.” Lester Kissel ’31 established a professorship in ethics at HLS reflecting his “abiding concern for the critical importance of ethical practice in the legal profession.” Wilkins, she said, among his many accomplishments “invented the country’s first four-credit course on the legal profession,” one which remains the most sought after in the curriculum.” He also created and directs the Program on the Legal Profession, and his wide-ranging research explores areas including the organizational and economic context influencing ethics in law practice; the career paths of lawyers; the study of diversity in the profession; and the exploration of how corporations purchase legal services, including the offshoring of legal work... Continue reading

Professor Wilkins was also featured in January 2011 issue of Harvard Law Today. Read the article

 

 

 
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