The Selden Society


 

Publications of the Selden Society

 


ANNUAL  VOLUMES

Series  ISSN  0265–0657

For summaries of the contents of Volumes 1–102, please see the Centenary Guide.

 

Vol. 128, for 2011:

CASE NOTES OF SIR SOULDEN LAWRENCE 1787 – 1800.

edited by Professor JAMES OLDHAM, St. Thomas More Professor of Law and Legal History, Georgetown University Law Center

 

0 85423

Lawrence, a Common Pleas and King’s Bench judge 1794-1812, left extensive manuscript notes of his cases. These were for his own use, necessary because of the non-reporting or very-delayed reporting of cases in the central courts during most of the 18th century.  In the introduction the editor chronicles this lack of regular and timely reporting, especially in the courts of Exchequer and Common Pleas.  Hence the importance of materials such as these, drawn from the extensive collection of Lawrence manuscripts in the Middle Temple and Lincoln’s Inn libraries.  The first part has notes of cases by Lawrence when still at the bar.  But the main content is his notes as a judge, from 1794.  These contain not only many unreported cases, but also supply the printed reports with much fuller detail; and include the unreported intermediate stages of litigation.  In the last section of the volume, the editor has selected examples from seven out of the many Paper Books among Lawrence’s manuscripts.  More information about the volume is found in the attached flyer and retail order form.  (This volume is not yet issued, but should be available shortly.)

 

Vol. 127, for 2010:

THREE CIVILIAN NOTEBOOKS: 1580 – 1640.

Edited by Professor R. H. HELMHOLZ, Ruth Wyatt Rosenson Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago.

0 85423

This volume contains texts and translations of the notebooks compiled by three English civilians during the last half of the sixteenth century and the first half of the seventeenth.  The compilers were Sir Julius Caesar (d. 1636), later MP and Master of Requests, Dr Thomas Eden (d. 1645), later MP and Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and William Colman (d. 1668), registrar of the court of the archdeacon of Sudbury held at Bury St Edmunds.  The contents are principally notations and comments about litigation in the ecclesiastical courts, the first from the Court of Arches and other London courts, the second from courts of the diocese of Ely and the third from the Colman’s own archdeaconry court.  The editor’s introduction describes the careers of the compilers and the form and sources of the notebooks, discussing the approaches to law and the sources of authority found in them.  It then situates them within the learned traditions of the ius commune.  More information about the volume is found in the attached flyer and retail order form.

 

Vol. 126, for 2009:

SELECT ECCLESIASTICAL CASES FROM THE KING’S COURTS 1272 – 1307.

Edited by Professor DAVID MILLON, J.B. Stombock Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University.

0 85423 127 7

In this volume are collected cases in the Common Bench, King’s Bench and eyres for the reign of Edward I in which conflicts of jurisdiction arose between these royal courts and the church courts.   The common law’s jurisdiction, though secular, and the canon law’s, though spiritual, could frequently overlap:  thus contract, debt, trespass, defamation, tithes, wills and all manner of criminal conduct could sometimes also have a spiritual aspect, and so be potentially justiciable in either forum. The editor’s introduction, 128 pages, provides a thorough explanation of the procedural and substantive law applied in the cases.  Departing from previous scholarship the editor argues that the jurisdictional boundaries enforced during the reign of Edward I remained largely consistent with established practice.  More information about the volume is found in the attached flyer and retail order form.

 

Vol. 125, for 2008:

IRISH EXCHEQUER REPORTS: Cases argued and determined in the Courts of Exchequer and Chancery in Ireland, 1716–34.

Edited by ANDREW LYALL, lld.

0 85423 126 9

This is the first volume by the Society of material from outside England but Ireland was then part of the legal regime of England and appeals lay to Westminster.  The volume is based on a manuscript at Columbia University which belonged to Henry Singleton (1682–1759), the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in Ireland.  The introduction surveys the practice of the Irish Exchequer, notes points of particular interest in the reports, and provides biographies of the principal lawyers whose speeches are reported.  More information about the volume is found in the attached flyer and retail order form.

 

Vol. 124, for 2007:

THE REPORTS OF WILLIAM DALISON, 1552–1558.

Edited by Sir JOHN BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 210 9

Dalison was justice of King’s and Queen’s Bench during the reigns of Philip and Mary.  The early printed edition of reports that bears his name is puzzling, because most of the reports in the volume date from after Dalison’s death in 1559.  The editor has discovered a manuscript that seems to be a copy of Dalison’s original, which is the basis of the edition.  The reports date from 1552 to 1558 and are of particular interest because they contain a substantial number of reports of criminal cases discussed in Serjeants’ Inn.

 

Vol. 123, for 2006:

EARLIEST ENGLISH LAW REPORTS. Vol. IV.

Edited by Dr PAUL A. BRAND, fba.

0 85423 200 1

This volume concludes the editing of all identifiable pre-1290 law reports. It contains cases from eyres later than those in the previous volume or which cannot be dated with certainty; reports from the Exchequer of the Jews; assize reports; and other reports from unidentified courts. The very extensive introduction surveys the beginning of law reproting, the nature of legal discourse and argument as revealed in these early reports, and the courts’ approach to the interpretations and application of statutes.

 

Vol. 122, for 2005:

EARLIEST ENGLISH LAW REPORTS. Vol. III.

Edited by Dr PAUL A. BRAND, fba.

0 85423 195 1

This volume continues the editing of the pre-1290 law reports begun in vols. 111 and 112, of which some 150 cases have been identified.  It contains pre-1285 general eyre reports from some twelve counties.  The introduction traces the background and careers of the dramatis personae, the judges and serjeants  who appear in the cases; and considers the early emergence of the professional lawyer.

 

Vol. 121 for 2004

REPORTS OF CASES IN THE TIME OF HENRY VIII. Vol.II.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 175 7

This volume completes the collection of reports started in the preceding volume and supplies indexes for both volumes.

 

Vol. 120 for 2003

REPORTS OF CASES IN THE TIME OF HENRY VIII. Vol. I.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 170 6

This is a collection of previously unpublished reports for the period 1509–1550, a period for which the printed year books cover only seven years.  Thirteen different series are included, the most important being those of Roger Yorke, Richard Pollard, John Caryll the younger, and William Yelverton.  This is the first period of history for which so many separate series of reports may be distinguished, and belies Maitland’s suggestion that in this period of rapid change there was a loss of interest in case law.

 

Vol. 119 for 2002

THE YEAR BOOKS OF 12–14 HENRY VIII.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 155

The two volumes 12–13 and 14 Henry VIII were printed not long after the cases were decided, and stand out from other year books by the selection of cases in which points of law were raised on the record rather than in extempore discussions and through tentative pleading.  Although the principal texts are in print (in black-letter editions), they are not easy to use.  Much can be learned from the editing process and especially from a comparison of reports and records.  Unlike the content of most other year books, nearly all the cases in these volumes are identifiable in the plea rolls.

 

Vol. 118 for 2001

CASES CONCERNING EQUITY AND THE COURTS OF EQUITY, 1550–1660, Part II

Edited by Professor W. H. BRYSON, Professor of Law, University of Richmond.

085423 160 9

A continuation of the edition in vol. 117, with reports from 1611 to 1660.  The tables and indices for both parts are in this volume.

 

Vol. 117 for 2000

CASES CONCERNING EQUITY AND THE COURTS OF EQUITY, 1550–1660, Part I
Edited by Professor W. H. BRYSON, Professor of Law, University of Richmond.

085423 145 5

A remarkable collection of hitherto-unpublished cases,. this includes in its entirety the earliest series of manuscript reports devoted to the Chancery, that of Richard Powle, who was register of the Court of Chancery under Elizabeth I, and an anonymous collection of notes made in the time of Lord Ellesmere (Lord Keeper, 1596–1603; Chancellor, 1603–1617).  As an experiment, these materials have been published entirely in English, with footnotes indicating difficult readings in the French.  The corresponding records are not printed here, but so far as possible, references are made to the relevant entries in the decree and order books.  This part includes specimen pleadings and reports to 1611.  Considerable assistance was given in the preparation of both parts by Dr. N. G. Jones.

 

Vol. 116 for 1999:

REPORTS OF CASES BY JOHN CARYLL, Part II. 1501–1522.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, lld, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 140 4

A continuation of the edition in Vol. 115, with cases from 1501 to 1522.  The tables and indices for both parts are in this volume.

 

Vol. 115 for 1998:

REPORTS OF CASES BY JOHN CARYLL, Part I. 1485–1499.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, lld, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge.

0 85423 135 8

These reports cover the period from 1485, when Caryll was a young member of the Inner Temple, through his years as a prothonotary of the Common Pleas (1493–1510) and as a serjeant at law, until shortly before his death in 1523. Most of the cases after 1496 were printed in 1602 as “Keilwey” but never translated, and a few were printed in the Year Books of Henry VII. About half, including most of the cases printed in this part, have never been printed before. They are of good quality, and can in many cases be illuminated by the corresponding records.

 

Vol. 114, for 1997:

SELECT CASES IN MANORIAL COURTS:  Property Law and Family Law, 1250–1500.

Edited by Professor L. BONFIELD of Tulane Law School, and Professor L. R. POOS of the Catholic University, Washington, D.C.

0 85423 125 0

Manorial court rolls survive in enormous quantity, though most of their contents are in common form and have more
to tell about local, social and economic history than about the law.  Vol. 2 (1888) provides a cross-section from some of the earliest rolls.  In this volume the editors have chosen a collection of unusually detailed entries which illustrate the ways in which questions of property and family law were dealt with at the manorial level over a longer period of time. In their introduction, they assess the extent to which these courts may be said to have followed legal principles in dealing with such questions, and also reveal what some of the main principles were.

 

Vol.113, additional for 1997:

JOHN SPELMAN’S READING ON QUO WARRANTO: Gray’s Inn, Lent 1519.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, fba,, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 219 2

The main purpose of this edition is to advance our understanding of the educational system in the inns of court as it operated in the first part of the sixteenth century.  The choice of Spelman’s second reading was governed by the survival of texts both of his lectures and of his disputed cases, this being the earliest reading for which both sources exist in any quantity.  The edition attempts to show how the system of disputation related to the expository part of the exercise, and also, by looking back at earlier readings on the same or similar subject matter, how a reader put his lectures together.  The subject of this reading is the law relating to royal franchises, which were central to the medieval and early modern legal system, and the parallel materials include lectures on liberties in general, tourns and leets, wreck, royal fish, and forest law.

 

Vol. 112, for 1996:

EARLIEST ENGLISH LAW REPORTS. Vol. II.

Edited by Dr PAUL BRAND.

0 85423 198 6

A continuation of the edition in Vol. 111, with cases from 1285 to 1292.  The introduction provides background information about the serjeants mentioned in the reports.

 

Vol. 111, for 1995:

EARLIEST ENGLISH LAW REPORTS. Vol. I.

Edited by Dr PAUL BRAND.

0 85423 193 5

English law-reporting began at the end of Henry III’s reign, but during the first half of the reign of his successor Edward I there is no Common Bench term for which more than seven datable reports survive.  Vols.111–112 contain all the reports of 142 cases heard in the Common Bench between 1268 and 1289, being all those which are identifiable as such in the miscellaneous collections of undated reports found in manuscript.  Three-quarters of the cases have been identified in the plea rolls, and the matching enrolments are printed with the reports.  The introduction describes the main manuscripts from which the reports are taken, and gives background information about the justices mentioned in them.

 

Vol. 110, for 1994:

REPORTS FROM THE LOST NOTEBOOKS OF SIR JAMES DYER. Vol. II.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, fba, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 188 9

This volume concludes the edition which commences in Vol. 109, with the main reports continuing from 1571 to 1581, and an edition of Dyer’s circuit notebook (1554–81).  The latter is the earliest continuous record of circuit practice, and the only such notebook ever to have been printed.  There are indexes and tables to both volumes.

 

Vol. 109, for 1993:

REPORTS FROM THE LOST NOTEBOOKS OF SIR JAMES DYER. Vol. I.

Edited by Professor J. H. BAKER, fba, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 183 8

This is the first edition of Elizabethan law reports to be undertaken by the Society and covers the period of Dyer’s chief justiceship of the Common Pleas (1559–81), with a few older cases going back to 1541.  The contents supplement the vulgate edition of Dyer, from which over 500 cases and memoranda were omitted.  The Introduction, besides giving a sketch of the reporter, concentrates on the issues of public law found in the reports: the Crown and the royal prerogative, Parliament and legislation, treason and public order, questions of religion, the protection of individual liberty against abuses of executive authority, and the work of the prerogative courts.  The text of this volume contains the reports (not before printed) from 1541 to 1571.

 

Vol. 108, for 1992:

HALE AND FLEETWOOD ON ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Edited by M. J. PRICHARD, Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, and D. E. C. YALE, fba, Fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 178 1

Unlike Vols 6 and 11, which contain specimen admiralty cases, the principal object of this volume is to present in detail the argument over maritime jurisdiction as it was developed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  A full historical introduction is followed by editions of two previously unpublished treatises, one by Serjeant William Fleetwood (d. 1594) and the other by Sir Matthew Hale (d. 1676).

 

Vol. 107, for 1991:

ENGLISH LAWSUITS FROM WILLIAM I TO RICHARD I. Vol.II. Henry I to Richard I.

Edited by Professor R. C. VAN CAENEGEM, University of Ghent.

0 85423 173 0

This concludes the edition which began in Vol. 106.

 

Vol. 106, for 1990:

ENGLISH LAWSUITS FROM WILLIAM I TO RICHARD I Vol.I. William I to Stephen.

Edited by Professor R. C. VAN CAENEGEM, University of Ghent.

0 85423 168 4

This two-volume collection, previously announced as a new Placita Anglo-Normannica, brings together all significant accounts of lawsuits between 1066 and 1199, drawn from chronicles, charters and similar sources.  It shows that the period before the formal limit of legal memory is by no means prehistoric, and provides the materials for an assessment of the institutional and procedural changes wrought in this period.

 

Vol. 105, for 1989:

READINGS AND MOOTS AT THE INNS OF COURT IN THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY. Vol. II.

Edited by Professor SAMUEL E. THORNE, Harvard Law School, and Professor J. H. BAKER, fba, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 163 3

Vol. I (Readings) was published as Vol. 71.  The text of this volume consists of a selection of moots (pleading exercises) and readers’ cases (disputations upon the propositions advanced in readings).  The volume also contains an introduction by Professor Baker tracing the evolution of the two kinds of disputation to the learning exercises of the fourteenth century, and some specimen moot cases.

 

Vol. 104, for 1988:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. VOL. XXVII. YEAR BOOKS OF 14 EDWARD II (Michaelmas 1320).

Edited by Professor S. J. STOLJAR and L. J. DOWNER, both of the Australian National University, Canberra.

0 85423 158 7

 

Vol. 103, for 1987:

SELECT CASES OF TRESPASS IN THE KING’S COURTS, 1307–1399. VOL. II.

Edited by the Hon. MORRIS S. ARNOLD, United States District Judge, Western District of Arkansas.

0 85423 153 6

This concludes the collection which begins in Vol. 100.

 

Vol. 102, for 1986:

THE NOTEBOOK OF SIR JOHN PORT.

Edited by Dr. J. H BAKER, fba, Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 148 X

 

Vol. 101, for 1985:

SELECT CASES ON DEFAMATION TO 1600.

Edited by Professor RICHARD H. HELMHOLZ of the University of Chicago

0 85423 143 9

 

Vol. 100, for 1984:

SELECT CASES OF TRESPASS IN THE KING’S COURTS, 1307–1399. Vol. I.

Edited by Professor MORRIS S. ARNOLD of Indiana University School of Law.

0 85423 138 2

Vol. II, completing the text and with an index, is Vol. 103 for 1987.

 

Vol. 99, for 1983:

FLETA. Vol IV. Books 5 and 6.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, d.litt, mria, fba.

0 85423 133 1

Vol. II was published as Vol. 72 for 1953.   Vol. III as Vol. 89, an extra volume for 1972.

 

Vol. 98, for 1982:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. THE EYRE OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, 1329–30. Vol. II.

Edited by Professor DONALD W. SUTHERLAND of the University of Iowa.

0 85423 128 5

 

Vol. 97, for 1981:

YEAR BOOK SERIES. THE EYRE OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, 1329–30. Vol. I.

Edited by Professor DONALD W. SUTHERLAND of the University of Iowa.

0 85423 123 4

 

Vol. 96, for 1980:

THE SHROPSHIRE EYRE ROLL OF 1256.

Edited by Professor ALAN HARDING, University of Liverpool.

0 85423 109 9

 

Vol. 95, for 1978 and 1979:

SELECT CASES FROM THE ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS OF THE PROVINCE OF CANTERBURY, c.1200–1301.

Edited by Professor NORMA ADAMS, Mount Holyoke College, and Professor CHARLES DONAHUE, JR, of  the Harvard Law School.

0 85423 110 2

This double volume was issued for convenience in one binding.

 

Vol. 94, for 1977:

THE REPORTS OF SIR JOHN SPELMAN  Part II.

Edited by Dr. J. H. BAKER, Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 113 7

This part contains the introduction and indexes.

 

Vol. 93, for 1976:

THE REPORTS OF SIR JOHN SPELMAN  Part I.

Edited by Dr. J. H. BAKER, Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 112 9

 

Vol. 92, for 1975:

THE PREROGATIVES OF THE KING, by Sir MATTHEW HALE.

Edited by D. E. C. YALE, Fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 114 5

 

Vol. 91, for 1974:

DOCTOR AND STUDENT, by CHRISTOPHER ST. GERMAN.

Edited by the late Professor T. F. T. PLUCKNETT, fba, and by J. L. BARTON, Fellow of Merton College, Oxford.

0 85423 099 8

 

Vol. 90 for 1972
and 1973:

THE ROLL AND WRIT FILE OF THE BERKSHIRE EYRE OF 1248.

Edited by DR M. T. CLANCHY, Lecturer in Medieval History, University of Glasgow.

0 85423 098 X

 

Vol. 89, additional for 1972:

FLETA. Vol. III. Books 3 and 4.

Edited by H. G. RICHARDSON, fba, and G. O. SAYLES, d.litt, mria, fba.

0 85423 094 7

Vol. II containing the Prologue and Books I and 2, was published as Vol. 72 for 1953.  Books 5 and 6) are in Vol. 99 for 1983.

 

Vol. 88, for 1971:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH. Vol. VII: Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V (1377–1422).

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, d.litt, mria, fba.

0 85423 003 3

The earlier volumes are Vols. 55 (1936); 57 (1938): 58 (1939); 74 (1955); 76 (1957); and 82 (1965).

 

Vol. 87, for 1970:

EARLY REGISTERS OF WRITS.

Edited by Dr. ELSA  DE  HAAS, Brooklyn College, and G. D. G. HALL, President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

0 85423 002 5

 

Vol. 86, for 1969:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXVI, Part II. THE EYRE OF LONDON, 14 EDWARD II (1321). Vol. II.

Edited by the late HELEN M. CAM, cbe, litt.d, fba.

0 85423 103 X

 

Vol. 85, for 1968:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXVI, Part I. THE EYRE OF LONDON, 14 EDWARD II (1321), Vol. I.

Edited by the late HELEN M. CAM, cbe, litt.d, fba.

0 85423 102 1

 

Vol. 84, for 1967:

PLEAS BEFORE THE KING OR HIS JUSTICES, 1198–1212. Vol. IV.

Edited by Lady STENTON, d.litt, hon ll.d, fba.

0 85423 119 6

 

Vol. 83, for 1966:

PLEAS BEFORE THE KING OR HIS JUSTICES, 1198–1212. Vol. III.

Edited by Lady STENTON, d.litt, hon ll.d, fba.

0 85423 118 8

Vols I and II were published in Vols 67 and 68.

 

Vol. 82, for 1965:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH. Vol. VI. Edward III: 1341–1377.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, mria, fba, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London.

0 85423 076 9

 

Vol. 81, for 1964:

YEAR BOOK SERIES. Vol. XXV. YEAR BOOKS OF 12 EDWARD II (1319).

Edited from sundry MSS. by J. P. COLLAS, b.litt, Professor of French in the University of London.

0 85423 214 1

This volume contains the remaining reports for Easter term and those for Trinity term, 12 Edward II.

 

Vol. 80, for 1963:

NOVAE NARRATIONES.

Edited by the late Miss ELSIE SHANKS and S. F. C. MILSOM, Fellow of New College, Oxford.

0 85423 077 7

 

Vol. 79, for 1961–62:

LORD NOTTINGHAM’S CHANCERY CASES. Vol. II.

Edited by D. E. C. YALE, ma, ll.b, Fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 092 0

Vol. I was published as Vol. 73 for 1954.

 

Vol. 78, for 1960:

PENSION BOOK OF CLEMENT’S INN, 1714–1749.

Edited with an introduction by Sir CECIL CARR, kcb, qc, fba

0 85423 010 6

 

Vol. 77, for 1958–1959:

ROYAL WRITS IN ENGLAND FROM THE CONQUEST TO GLANVILL:  Studies in the early history of the common law.

Edited by Dr. R. C. VAN CAENEGEM, University of Ghent.

0 85423 008 4

 

Vol. 76, for 1957:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH. Vol. V. Edward III, 1327–1340.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt, mria, King’s College, University of Aberdeen.

0 85423 075 0

 

Vol. 75, for 1956:

SELECT CASES IN THE COUNCIL OF HENRY VII.

Edited by the late C. G. BAYNE, c.s.i., and prepared for publication by WILLIAM HUSE DUNHAM, JR, George Burton Adams Professor of History and Master of JonathanEdwards College, Yale University.

0 85423 074 2

 

Vol. 74, for 1955:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH. Vol. IV. Edward II.

Edited by Professor G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt, mria, King’s College, University of Aberdeen.

0 85423 074 2

 

Vol. 73, for 1954:

LORD NOTTINGHAM’S CHANCERY CASES. Vol. I.

Edited by D. E. C. YALE, ma, ll.b, Fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge.

0 85423 088 2

Vol. II was published as Vol. 79 for 1961–62.

 

Vol. 72, for 1953:

FLETA. Vol. II. Prologue, Books 1 and 2.

Edited by H. G. RICHARDSON, fba, and Professor G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt, of the University of Aberdeen

0 85423 067 X

(Books 3 & 4 are contained in Vol. 89 for 1972 and Books 5 & 6 in Vol. 99 for 1983.

 

Vol. 71, for 1952:

READINGS AND MOOTS AT THE INNS OF COURT IN THE l5TH CENTURY. Vol. I. Readings.

Edited by SAMUEL E. THORNE, Professor of Legal History, Yale Law School.

0 85423 083 1

 

Vol. 70, for 1951:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXIV. YEAR BOOKS OF 12 EDWARD II (1319).

Edited by J. P. COLLAS, B.LITT., Professor of French, and T. F. T. PLUCKNETT, fba, Professor of Legal History, in the University of London.

0 85423 055 6

This volume contains the reports for Hilary term and for part of Easter term 12 Edward II.

 

Vol. 69, for 1950:

THE CASUS PLACITORUM and REPORTS OF CASES IN THE KING’S COURTS,  1272–1278.

Edited with an introduction by WILLIAM HUSE DUNHAM, JR, George Burton Adams Professor of History in Yale University.

0 85423 013 0

 

Vol. 68, for 1949:

PLEAS BEFORE THE KING OR HIS JUSTICES, 1198–1202. Vol. II.

Edited by Lady STENTON, d.litt, fba, Senior Lecturer in the University of Reading.

0 85423 079 3

Vols. III and IV were published as Vols 83 and 84 for 1966 and 1967.

 

Vol. 67, for 1948:

PLEAS BEFORE THE KING OR HIS JUSTICES, 1198–1202. Vol. I.

Edited by Lady STENTON, d.litt, fba, Senior Lecturer in the University of Reading.

0 85423 078 5

 

Vol. 66, for 1947:

BREVIA PLACITATA.

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, fba, and completed with additions by Professor T. F. T. PLUCKNETT, fba, Professor of Legal History in the University of London.

0 85423 084 X

 

Vol. 65, for 1946:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXIII. YEAR BOOKS OF 12 EDWARD II (Michaelmas a.d. 1318).

Edited by J. P. COLLAS, b.litt, ba, and T. F. T. PLUCKNETT, fba, Professor of Legal History in the University of London.

0 85423 054 8

 

Vol. 64, for 1945:

SELECT CASES IN THE EXCHEQUER CHAMBER BEFORE ALL THE JUSTICES OF ENGLAND. Vol. II (1461–1509).

Edited by M. HEMMANT, ph.d

0 85423 024 6

This volume continues the selection begun in Vol. 51 for 1933.

 

Vol. 63, for 1944:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. X. YEAR BOOKS OF 5 EDWARD II (a.d. 1311).

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, fba, completed with an introduction by Professor T. F. T. PLUCKNETT, fba.

0 85423 061 0

This volume contains the reports for the Michaelmas term. The volumes for the other terms of 5 Edward II were issued as Vols. XI and XII in the Year Books Series and appeared as Vols. 31 and 33 for 1915 and 1916, respectively.

 

Vol. 62, for 1943:

INTRODUCTION TO THE CURIA REGIS ROLLS, 1199–1230.

By C. T. FLOWER, cb, ma, fsa.

0 85423 015 7

 

Vol. 61, for 1942:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXII. YEAR BOOKS OF 11 EDWARD II (1317–1318).

Edited by J. P. COLLAS, b.litt, ba, and Sir W. S. HOLDSWORTH, om, kc, dcl, hon ll.d, fba, Vinerian Professor of English Law.

0 85423 053 X

 

Vol. 60, for 1941:

SELECT CASES OF PROCEDURE WITHOUT WRIT UNDER HENRY III.

Edited by H. G. RICHARDSON and Professor G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt.

0 85423 068 8

 

Vol. 59, for 1940:

ROLLS OF THE JUSTICES IN EYRE FOR GLOUCESTERSHIRE, WARWICKSHIRE, AND SHROPSHIRE, 1221, 1222.

Edited by DORIS M. STENTON.

0 85423 080 7

 

Vol. 58, for 1939.:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH UNDER EDWARD I. Vol. III.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt.

0 85423 073 4

 

Vol. 57, for 1938:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH UNDER EDWARD I. Vol. II.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt.

0 85423 072 6

 

Vol. 56, for 1937:

ROLLS OF THE JUSTICES IN EYRE FOR YORKSHIRE IN 3 HENRY III (1218–1219).

Edited, from the rolls in the Public Record Office, by DORIS M. STENTON.

0 85423 209 5

 

Vol. 55, for 1936:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH UNDER EDWARD I, Vol. I.

Edited by G. O. SAYLES, ma, d.litt.

0 85423 071 8

The series is continued in Vols. 57, 58, 74, 76, 82, and 88.

 

Vol. 54, for 1935:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XXI. YEAR BOOKS OF 10 EDWARD II (1316–1317).

Edited by M. DOMINICA LEGGE, b.litt, ma, and Sir WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH, kc, dcl, hon ll.d, fba, Vinerian Professor of English Law.

0 85423 052 1

This volume contains the reports of Hilary, Easter and Trinity terms 10 Edward II.

 

Vol. 53, additional for 1934:

ROLLS OF THE JUSTICES IN EYRE FOR LINCOLNSHIRE (1218–1219) AND WORCESTERSHIRE (1221).

Edited by DORIS M. STENTON.

0 85423 081 5

 

Vol. 52, for 1934:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XX. YEAR BOOKS OF 10 EDWARD II (1316–1317).

Edited by M. DOMINICA LEGGE, b.litt, ma, and Sir WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH, kc, dcl, hon ll.d, fba, Vinerian Professor of English Law.

0 85423 051 3

This volume contains the reports for Michaelmas term, 10 Edward II.

 

Vol. 51, additional for 1933:

SELECT CASES IN THE EXCHEQUER CHAMBER.

Edited by M. HEMMANT, ph.d

0 85423 023 8

This is continued in Vol. 64 for 1945.

 

Vol. 50, for 1933:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES, YEAR BOOKS OF HENRY VI, 1 HENRY VI (a.d. 1422).

Edited by C. H. WILLIAMS, ma.

0 85423 121 8

 

Vol. 49, for 1932:

SELECT CASES CONCERNING THE LAW MERCHANT. Vol. III. STATUTORY RECOGNIZANCES AND SPECIAL ASSIZES.

Edited by HUBERT HALL, litt.d, fsa.

0 85423 021 1

The work which Professor Charles Gross inaugurated with Vol. 23, was continued in Vol. 46 for 1929.

 

Vol. 48, for 1931:

SELECT CASES IN THE EXCHEQUER OF PLEAS.

Edited, from the records in the Public Record Office. by HILARY JENKINSON, fsa, and BERYL E. R. FORMOY.

0 85423 026 2

 

Vol. 47, for 1930:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. YEAR BOOKS OF 10 EDWARD IV AND 49 HENRY VI (a.d. 1470).

Edited by Miss N. NEILSON, of Mount Holyoke College.

0 85423 122 6

This volume includes cases of a year divided between two reigns: Easter and Trinity terms 10 Edward IV; and Michaelmas and Hilary terms 49 Henry VI.

 

Vol. 46, for 1929:

SELECT CASES CONCERNING THE LAW MERCHANT. Vol. II. CENTRAL COURTS.

Edited by HUBERT HALL, litt.d, fsa.

0 85423 020 3

This volume was envisaged by the late Professor Charles Gross and referred to in his preface to Vol. I, published as Vol. 23 for 1908. Vol. III appears as Vol. 49 for 1932.

 

Vol. 45, for 1928:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XIX. YEAR BOOKS OF 9 EDWARD II (1315–1316).

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, and W. C. BOLLAND, ll.d, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barristers.

0 85423 050 5

 

Vol. 44, for 1927:

LIBER PAUPERUM OF VACARIUS.

Edited by F. DE ZULUETA, dcl, Regius Professor of Civil Law in the University of Oxford.

0 85423 089 0

 

Vol. 43, for 1926:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XIV. Part II. YEAR BOOKS OF 6 EDWARD II (a.d. 1313).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 045 9

This volume contains the reports of the Hilary and Easter terms of the sixth year, and is a continuation of Vol. XIV, Part I, issued as Vol. 38 for 1921.

 

Vol. 42, for 1925.:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. IX. YEAR BOOKS OF 4 EDWARD II (1311).

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 041 6

This volume contains all the reports of Trinity term, 4 Edward II, together with a few undated reports of earlier terms.

 

Vol. 41, for 1924:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. VOL. XVII. YEAR BOOKS OF 8 EDWARD II (1314–1315).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 048 3

This volume includes cases heard in the Hilary, Easter and Trinity terms of the eighth year.

 

Vol. 40, for 1923:

PUBLIC WORKS IN MEDIAEVAL LAW. Vol. II.

Edited by C. T. FLOWER, fsa, of the Public Record Office and the Inner Temple, Barrister.

0 85423 017 3

 

 

Vol. 39, for 1922:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XVI. YEAR BOOKS OF 7 EDWARD II (1313–1314).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 047 5

This volume includes cases heard in all the terms of the seventh year.

 

Vol. 38, for 1921.:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XIV. Part I. YEAR BOOKS OF 6 EDWARD II (a.d. 1312–1313).

Edited by Sir PAUL VINOGRADOFF, fba, and Dr LUDWIK EHRLICH,  Lecturer in the University of Lwow.

0 85423 044 0

This volume contains the remainder of the cases of Michaelmas term, 6 Edward II, which could not be included in Year Book Series, Vol. XIII.

 

Vol. 37, for 1920:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XVIII. YEAR BOOKS OF 8 EDWARD II (a.d. 1314).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 049 1

This volume contains the reports of the Michaelmas term of the eighth year.

 

Vol. 36, for 1918:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XV. YEAR BOOKS OF 6 AND 7 EDWARD II (1313).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 046 7

This volume contains reports of cases heard in the Hilary term of 6 Edward II and in Michaelmas term of the following regnal year.

 

Vol. 35, for 1919:

SELECT CASES BEFORE THE KING’S COUNCIL.

Edited by I. S. LEADAM and Professor J. F. BALDWIN.

0 85423 030 0

The volume was printed in America by the Harvard University Press, owing to the war.  The title page as originally printed describes it as Vol. 36, for 1918.  As it was not practicable to send the volume to England in 1918, it was not issued until 1919, when its volume number was altered to Vol. 35, as Vol. 36 had in the meantime been issued.  Some copies were issued unaltered as to number of the volume on the title page and the spine.

 

Vol. 34, for 1917:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XIII. YEAR BOOKS OF 6 EDWARD II (1312–1313).

Edited by Sir PAUL VINOGRADOFF, fba, and  Dr LUDWIK EHRLICH, Lecturer in Political Science in the University of California.

0 85423 043 2

This volume contains reports of cases in the Michaelmas term of 6 Edward II.

 

Vol. 33, for 1916:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XII. YEAR BOOKS OF 5 EDWARD II (1312).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND. of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 042 4

This volume includes reports of cases heard in the Easter and Trinity terms of 5 Edward II.

 

Vol. 32 for 1915:

PUBLIC WORKS IN MEDIAEVAL LAW. Vol. I.

Edited by C. T. FLOWER, of the Public Record Office and the Inner Temple, Barrister.

0 85423 016 5

Vol. II was published as Vol. 40 for 1923.

 

Vol. 31, for 1915:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. XI. YEAR BOOKS OF 5 EDWARD II (1311–1312).

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 062 9

This volume includes reports of cases heard in the Hilary and Easter terms of 5 Edward II.  Vol. X, covering Michaelmas term, 5 Edward II, edited by Mr.G. J. Turner and completed with an introduction by Professor T. F. T. Plucknett, appeared as Vol. 63 for 1944.

 

 

Vol. 30, for 1914:

SELECT BILLS IN EYRE, 1292–1333.

Edited by W. C.BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 007 6

 

Vol. 29, for 1913:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. VIII. THE EYRE OF KENT OF 6 AND 7 EDWARD II (1313–1314), Vol. III.

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 060 2

This is a continuation of Vol. 27 published for 1912 (Year Books Series, Vol.VII), comprising the remainder of the civil pleas in alphabetical order, and a collection of notes dealing with miscellaneous matters.

 

Vol. 28, for 1913:

SELECT CHARTERS OF TRADING COMPANIES.

Edited by CECIL T. CARR, of the Inner Temple, Barrister.

0 85423 012 2

 

Vol. 27, for 1912:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. VII. THE EYRE OF KENT OF 6 AND 7 EDWARD II (1313–1314), Vol. II.

Edited by W. C. BOLLAND, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister, Professor F. W. MAITLAND and L. W. VERNON HARCOURT.  With facsimile of a specimen of MS.

0 85423 040 8

This is a continuation of Vol. 24 published for 1909 (Year Books Series, Vol.V), comprising the civil pleas arranged in alphabetical order from Account to Mesne.

 

Vol. 26, for 1911:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. VI. YEAR BOOKS OF 4 EDWARD II (1310–1311).

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 039 4

This is a continuation of Vol. IV of this series, and contains the reports for Michaelmas, Hilary and Easter terms of 4 Edward II. The rest of the Year Book of 4 Edward II, edited by Mr. Turner, is in the Year Books Series, Vol. IX, covering Trinity term, and was issued as Vol. 42 for 1925.

 

Vol. 25, for 1910:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE COURT OF STAR CHAMBER, 1509–1544. Vol. II.

Edited by I. S. LEADAM, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 059 9

Vol. I was published as Vol. 16 for 1902.

 

Vol. 24, for 1909:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. V. THE EYRE OF KENT OF 6 AND 7 EDWARD II (1313–1314), Vol. I.

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND, L. W. VERNON HARCOURT and W. C. BOLLAND, Barristers

0 85423 038 6

The remaining volumes in this series were issued as Vol. 27 (Year Books Series, Vol. VII) for 1912 and as Vol. 29 (Year Books Series, Vol. VIII) for 1913.

 

Vol. 23, for 1908:

SELECT CASES CONCERNING THE LAW MERCHANT. Vol. I, LOCAL COURTS.

Edited by CHARLES GROSS, Professor of History, Harvard University.

0 85423 019 X

Vols. II and III, edited by Dr. Hubert Hall, appear as Vols. 46 and 49 for 1929 and 1932.

 

Vol. 22, for 1907:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. IV. YEAR BOOKS OF 3 and 4 EDWARD II (1310).

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND and G. J. TURNER, ma, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 037 8

 

 

Vol. 21, for 1906:

BOROUGH CUSTOMS. Vol. II.

Edited by Miss MARY BATESON, Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge.

0 85423 095 5

Vol. I was published as Vol. 18 for 1904.

 

Vol. 20, for 1905:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. III. YEAR BOOKS OF 3 EDWARD II (1309–1310).

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 036 X

 

Vol. 19, for 1904:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. II. YEAR BOOKS OF 2 AND 3 EDWARD II (1308–1309 and 1309–1310).

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 035 1

 

Vol. 18, for 1904:

BOROUGH CUSTOMS. Vol. I.

Edited by Miss MARY BATESON, Fellow of Newnham College, Cambridge.

0 85423 006 8

Vol. II was published as Vol. 21 for 1906.

 

Vol. 17, for 1903:

YEAR BOOKS SERIES. Vol. I.  YEAR BOOKS OF 1 AND 2 EDWARD II (1307–1308 and 1308–1309).

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 204 4

The introduction to this volume contains a remarkable account of the language of the Year Books with tables of accidence.

 

Vol. 16, for 1902:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE COURT OF STAR CHAMBER, 1477–1509. Vol. I.

Edited by I. S.LEADAM, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 031 9

Vol. II was published as Vol. 25 for 1910.

 

Vol. 15, for 1901:

SELECT PLEAS, STARRS, etc., OF THE JEWISH EXCHEQUER, 1220–1284.

Edited, from the rolls in the Public Record Office, by J. M. RIGG, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 069 6

 

Vol. 14, for 1900:

BEVERLEY TOWN DOCUMENTS.

Edited by ARTHUR  F. LEACH, Barrister, Assistant Charity Commissioner.

0 85423 028 9

 

Vol. 13, for 1899:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE FOREST.

Edited by G. J. TURNER, ma, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 085 8

 

Vol. 12, for 1898:

SELECT CASES IN THE COURT OF REQUESTS, 1497–1569.

Edited by I. S. LEADAM, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 029 7

 

 

Vol. 11, for 1897:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE COURT OF ADMIRALTY. Vol. II, 1547–1602.

Edited by REGINALD  G. MARSDEN, of the Inner Temple, Barrister.

0 85423 064 5

This volume continues from Vol. 6 for 1892.

 

Vol. 10, for 1896:

SELECT CASES IN CHANCERY, 1364–1471.

Edited by W. PALEY BAILDON, fsa.

0 85423 004 1

 

Vol. 9, for 1895:

SELECT CASES FROM THE CORONERS’ ROLLS, 1265–1413.

Edited by CHARLES GROSS, Professor of History, Harvard University.

0 85423 022 X

 

Vol. 8, for 1894:

SELECT PASSAGES FROM BRACTON AND AZO.

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 056 4

 

Vol. 7, for 1893:

THE MIRROR OF JUSTICES.

Edited by W. J. WHITTAKER, ma, and Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 086 6

 

 

Vol. 6, for 1892:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE COURT OF ADMIRALTY. Vol. 1, 1390–1404 and 1527–1545.

Edited by REGINALD  G. MARSDEN, of the Inner Temple, Barrister.

0 85423 063 7

Continued in Vol. 11 for 1897.

 

Vol. 5, for 1891:

THE LEET JURISDICTION IN THE CITY OF NORWICH.

Edited by the Rev. W. HUDSON, ma.  With map and facsimile.

0 85423 025 4

 

Vol. 4, for 1890:

THE COURT BARON: PRECEDENTS OF PLEADING IN MANORIAL AND OTHER LOCAL COURTS.

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND and W. PALEY BAILDON, fsa.

0 85423 033 5

 

Vol. 3, for 1889:

SELECT CIVIL PLEAS. Vol. 1, 1200–1203.

Edited by W. PALEY BAILDON, fsa, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

0 85423 005 X

This series was not continued as such, the publication of the plea rolls having been undertaken by the Public Record Office.

 

Vol. 2, for 1888:

SELECT PLEAS IN MANORIAL AND OTHER SEIGNORIAL COURTS. Vol. 1, Henry III and Edward I.

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.

0 85423 057 2

This series was not continued as such, but a further volume of pleas in manorial courts was published as Vol. 114 for 1997.

 

Vol. 1, for 1887:

SELECT PLEAS OF THE CROWN. Vol. 1, 1200–1225.

Edited by Professor F. W. MAITLAND.  With facsimile.

0 85423 058 0

This series was not continued as such, the publication of the plea rolls having been undertaken by the Public Record Office.

 

Return to index.

 

ANNUAL  VOLUMES  IN  PREPARATION

SELECT CASES IN MANORIAL COURTS: Personal Litigation (1250–1350)
Edited by CHRISTOPHER BRIGGS of Trinity College, Cambridge and Professor PHILLIP SCHOFIELD of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

This will explore the range and development of litigation in manorial courts during the first century for which their rolls survive, complementing previous studies in Vols. 2 and 114. The editors will investigate the stages of litigation: mesne process, modes of trial, of proof, and of enforcement; the variations between lordships and local communities and between regions; and the relationship between the developments at common law and in the manorial courts.
 

THE COURT OF THE JUSTICIAR OF ENGLAND (1258–60)
Edited by Dr ANDREW HERSHEY.

In the Provisions of Oxford the rebel barons appointed Hugh Bigod ‘to right the wrongs done by all the other justices, bailiffs, earls, barons, and all other persons’. His court’s unpublished records, with over a thousand entries, show Bigod taking such action against the worst excesses of royal bureaucracy, and including against the king himself. The introduction will address the barons’ ideal of justice and law as simple, immediate, and personal, as well as new procedures and the interest of the cases.
 

COMMON LAWYERS AND THE CHURCH
Edited by Professor MARGARET McGLYNN of the University of Western Ontario.

The attitude of the common lawyers to the church the century before the Reformation is here revealed in a number of manuscript readings on Magna Carta c.1. The readers focus on grants to the church, sanctuary, benefit of clergy, and the jurisdiction of the church courts. The latest of these readings dates to about 1530, but the editor has added two later manuscripts: a series of responses by a common lawyer, c.1535, apparently to questions put by those revising canon law; and Edward Hall’s reading of 1541 on ‘Seint Eglise’ using 2 Hen. IV c.1 as his text. An introduction will study the relationship between the manuscripts and outline the legal developments as shown by the readings.
 

EARLIEST ENGLISH LAW REPORTS
Edited by Dr PAUL BRAND, fba, Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.

Dr Brand will continue this important series, begun in Vols 111, 112, 122 and 123, with a volume of unpublished reports of cases decided in 1290-91. Successive volumes will then continue the series to 1307, filling in gaps and supplementing the Rolls Series reports for those years, and with matching enrollments.
 

STAUNFORD’S PLEAS OF THE CROWN
Edited by JOHN ABERDEEN, Barrister, Queensland.

Sir William Staunford’s Les Plees de Coron was first printed in law-French in 1557. It is one of the classic treatises on English criminal law. It marked a new era in legal publishing, in that the author made full use of printed authorities, cited in profusion. The book has never been published in English translation. The new edition, with modernised references and a full apparatus, will make it much more accessible.
 

THE YEAR BOOKS OF HENRY IV: BRYT’S REPORTS (1410–1411)
Edited by NICHOLAS LePOIDEVIN, of Lincoln’s Inn, Barrister.

These are the earliest year-book reports by an identifiable author and provide a valuable comparison with the ‘vulgate’ year books for the same period. Bryt lived in Wiltshire, and his reports include cases from the western circuit.
 

ENGLISH ECCLESIASTICAL REPORTS, 1550–1650.
Edited by Professor R. H. HELMHOLZ,  University of Chicago Law School.

Very few reports of ecclesiastical cases have been printed from the period before 1800, and none before 1700.  This volume will make available for the first time a body of case-law found in the notebooks of the Civilians, containing cases from Elizabeth I to Charles I.
 

SELECT CASES OF PROHIBITION UNDER EDWARD I.
Edited by Professor DAVID  K. MILLON, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia.

This collection of cases, mostly culled from the plea rolls of the two benches, will be designed to show how the king’s courts delimited the scope of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in the age of Circumspecte agatis.  It will also include a reassessment of the effect of that writ, derived from a study of the Norfolk eyre of 1286;  and selections from the eyre rolls will be included.
 

THE EYRES OF 3 AND 4 EDWARD III (1329–1331)

The first stage of this project was completed in 1982 with the publication in Vols. 97 and 98 of The Eyre of Northamptonshire 1329–1330, edited by the late Professor D. W. Sutherland of the University of Iowa. Professor Sutherland intended to continue with the reports of the remaining counties of this eyre (Nottinghamshire, Bedfordshire and Derbyshire) and left the Eyre of Nottinghamshire in an advanced state of preparation.  It is hoped that the edition will be completed by Professor R. C. Palmer of the University of Houston, Texas.
 

SELECT CASES OF REPLEVIN UNDER EDWARD I.
Edited by Dr PAUL BRAND.

Dr Brand proposes to continue the series begun in vols. 111–112 with an edition of all known reports of thirteenth-century eyre cases and reports from other cases.  When the editor has completed this work, all the surviving reports from this formative phase of English law will be available in print in a modern scholarly edition.
 
THE MEDIEVAL COUNTY COURT.
Edited by Professor R. C. PALMER of the University of Houston.

This volume will contain materials on the county in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Prominent among these are the county rolls of Cornwall from 7 Edward III, records of various counties from the writ files of the reign of Edward I, and a unique series of county court law reports from Warwickshire ca.1303.  The volume will provide much information concerning the scheduling of sessions, the identity and roles of under-sheriffs, suitors and others active in the county, the court’s jurisdiction, the pleading of actions, and the relationship of the county to other jurisdictions.
 
SELECT CASES FROM THE ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS OF YORK, 1300–1500.
Edited by Professor CHARLES  DONAHUE, JR, of the Harvard Law School.

Among the pre-Reformation court material in the archdiocesan and the Dean and Chapter archives at York are nearly six hundred sets of cause papers, actual documents used in litigation from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.  This volume will contain an edition of the more interesting of these papers and a calendar of the rest.  So far as possible, the cause papers will be related to the surviving fragments of court acts book from the period.  The papers often contain decisions, and show how the academic and papal law was being applied in practice.  They also contain much information about how the York ecclesiastical courts worked, how conflicts in jurisdiction were resolved, and who were the judges, advocates, proctors and other officers.  Depositions give us much social information, and give it in unusual detail.

The volume will be a companion to the selection of cases from Canterbury published as Vol.95 for 1978–9.   It will begin at about the period at which that volume ends, but will provide some basis of comparison for the practice of the northern and southern provinces.

Return to index.

 

 

SUPPLEMENTARY  SERIES

Series  ISSN 0582-4788

This extra series was started in 1965.  Volumes are printed and bound in a uniform style and size (royal octavo).
 
Volumes  Already  Published

 

17          

KING’S BENCH AND COMMON BENCH IN THE REIGN OF HENRY III

Compiled by the late C.A.F. MEEKINGS and Dr DAVID CROOK, formerly of The National Archives (2010)
members  £35  ($70) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).    

0 85423 132 3

The volume provides the fullest account of the courts in this formative period of the common law as revealed in the extensive surviving records; with a detailed account of the records themselves and their hazardous history. The volume is in three parts. The introduction is a complete exposition of and guide to the records, their physical nature, development, custody, arrangement and means of reference. There follows a detailed narrative history of the court coram rege, later the King’s Bench, with the careers of its individual justices from its revival to the end of the reign, with particular coverage of the period 1239 to 1258. The third part of the volume consists of a term-by-term list of the sessions of the court de banco, the Common Bench. A fuller description of the volume (in Word format) may be found by clicking here.

 

16          

ENGLISH LEGAL MANUSCRIPTS FORMERLY IN THE COLLECTION OF SIR THOMAS PHILLIPPS

By Sir JOHN BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge (2008)
members  £35  ($70) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).     

0 85423 131 5

Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792–1872) spent his life and his fortune seeking and gathering from all over Europe the greatest collection of manuscripts ever in private hands, over 40,000 items. The Phillipps collection, which was dispersed after his death, was never properly catalogued. The present volume lists all of the legal manuscripts that were in bound volumes, the law books. It also includes some letters, charters, conveyances, court rolls, state papers and the like where these are of particular interest. A fuller description of the volume (in Word format) may be found by clicking here.

 

15          

CATALOGUE OF THE LEGAL MANUSCRIPTS OF ANTHONY TAUSSIG

By Sir JOHN BAKER, qc, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge, and ANTHONY TAUSSIG, barrister of Lincoln’s Inn. (2007).            
members  £35  ($70) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

 0 85423 205 2

The Taussig manuscripts form the most important collection of English legal manuscripts still in private hands.  The contents range from the only known privately-held manuscript of Bracton to important collections of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century correspondence (notably that of Sir Michael Foster, Sir William Blackstone, Lord Thurlow, and William Tidd, the celebrated special pleader).  There are fifty illustrations, providing legible specimens of many different kinds of legal manuscripts and legal hands.

 

 

14          

THE LETTERS OF SIR WILLIAM BLACKSTONE: 1744–1780

Edited by Professor W. R. PREST, of the University of Adelaide. (2006).            
members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

0 85423 190 0

Though best known for his famous Commentaries on the Laws of England, these letters, mostly unpublished, show Blacksone’s extraordinarily diverse range of interests and involvements.  Beyond his career as a law student, brrister, Oxford don, jurist, and judge, the letters show him as an antiquary, bibliophile, historian, literary critic, poet, administrator, politician, member of parliament, and law reformer; and more personally as father and husband, colleague, and friend.  The letters are thus a primary source for the cultural, legal, political, and social history of Hanoverian England.  The editor has provided an extensive introduction with a chronology of Blackstone’s life, the sources and locations of all 183 letters, and a list of correspondents.

 

13          

READERS AND READINGS IN THE INNS OF COURT AND CHANCERY
By Professor J. H. BAKER, qc, ll.d, fba, Downing Professor of the Laws of England, Cambridge. (2000).             
members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

0 85423 150 1

The inns of court and chancery in their heyday (between the mid-fourteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries) were one of the largest and most influential law schools in the history of the world, whose teaching was in a real sense law.  Yet changes in the character of the common law and its study have placed its learning largely beyond reach for the last three hundred years.  This book is the culmination of research—over many years and two continents—for texts of the lectures delivered in that law school, and of notes derived them.  The first part contains tables of readers for each of the inns, with references to what is known about their lectures, and brief biographies.  The second part is a bibliography of nearly two thousand texts, mostly manuscripts dating between 1400 and 1700.  While there will inevitably be omissions in such a work, it is hoped that it will open up the further study of this forgotten genre of common-law study. A fuller description of the volume (in Word format) may be found by clicking here.

 

12.        THE ADMISSIONS REGISTERS OF BARNARD’S INN, 1620–1869.
             Edited by Dr C. W. BROOKS, Department of History, University of Durham.   (1996).  0 85423 139 0
             members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

The inns of chancery for at least two hundred years were part of a common-law university, and for somewhat longer provided accommodation for attorneys. The membership register of this particular inn during its last 250 years is preserved in Gray’s Inn, and the editor has added biographical details (especially of the attorneys) where they have been discovered. This is in itself an important work of biographical reference, but the introduction also contains the first scholarly history of Barnard’s Inn from beginning to end.  There are a number of plates showing, amongst other things, what the inn looked like.

11.         THE LETTERS OF FREDERIC WILLIAM MAITLAND, Vol. II.
              Edited by Dr P. ZUTSHI, Keeper of Manuscripts, Cambridge University Library. (1995).      
                                                                                                                                           0 85423 134 X
              members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

This volume adds another 361 letters to the corpus edited by Fifoot in 1965 (Vol. 1). Some of them have previously appeared in print in various scattered publications, though most are published here for the first time. The editor has added introductory essays on ‘Maitland the Man’ and ‘Maitland the Historian’.

10.         THE JUDGES OF ENGLAND, 1272–1990.
              Compiled by Sir JOHN SAINTY. (1993).       0 85423 129 3
              members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

This is the first complete and accurate list of the judges of the superior courts in England, with their precise dates of office, and is an indispensable work of reference for all scholars working with English cases. It comprises the justices of the two benches, barons of the Exchequer, Masters of the Rolls, Vice-Chancellors, Lords Justices of Appeal, justices of the High Court, and Lords of Appeal in Ordinary.

9.          THE DIARY OF SIR RICHARD HUTTON, 1614–1639.
             Edited by Dr W. R. PREST of the University of Adelaide.   (1991).     0 85423 124 2
             members  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  £40  ($80).

These legal memoranda, written in a mixture of law French and English, were kept by Hutton during his days as a serjeant at law and justice of the Common Pleas. They include eye-witness accounts of public events, notes of speeches and legal ceremonies, and frankly drawn characters of legal and political contemporaries.

8.          THE TEACHING OF ROMAN LAW IN ENGLAND AROUND 1200.
             By the late Professor FRANCIS DE ZULUETA, sometime Regius Professor of Civil Law at Oxford,
             and Professor PETER STEIN, FBA, Regius Professor of Civil Law at Cambridge.    (1990).
                                                                                                                                   0 85423 218 4
             members:  £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members  (£40)  ($80).

The text of a late twelfth-century course of lectures on Justinian’s Institutes, formerly associated with Master Vacarius of Oxford but apparently given by one of his pupils in the late 1190s. Professor Stein’s introduction illuminates the teaching of Roman civil law in Anglo-Norman England.
 

7.          A LIST OF ENGLISH LAW OFFICERS AND KING’S COUNSEL AND HOLDERS OF
             PATENTS OF PRECEDENCE.
             Compiled by Sir JOHN SAINTY.      (1987).       0 85423 213 3
             members:   £30  ($60) inclusive;  non-members:  £40  ($80).

This is a fully documented list of the names, dates of appointment and periods of office of the king’s serjeants, attorneys-general, solicitors-general, king’s advocates,  king’s counsel, and holders of patents of precedence, from the earliest times down to 1984.
 

6.          CHRISTOPHER St. GERMAN ON CHANCERY AND STATUTE.
             Edited by Dr J. A. GUY, Department of History, University of Bristol.  (1985).  0 85423 208 7
             members: £20  ($40) inclusive;   non-members: £24  ($48).

The volume is a companion to J. L. Barton’s edition of St. German’s Doctor and Student, published by the Society in 1974. It contains the "Replication" to Doctor and Student by an anonymous "serjeant-at-law", together with a controversial reply, "A Little Treatise concerning Writs of Subpoena", now known to be by St. German himself. The edition includes proposals for parliamentary legislation arising from St. German’s Little Treatise Called the New Additions, proposals laid before Henry VIII’s government in 1530 and 1531, together with new information both on this important author’s manuscript writings and his role as an adviser and polemicist in the 1530s.

5.          THE ORDER OF SERJEANTS AT LAW, 1383–l875.
             By Dr J. H. BAKER, Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.       (1984).   0 85423 203 6
             members: £30  ($60) inclusive;   non-members: £40  ($80).

Previous lists of serjeants, such as Dugdale’s, were based solely on the writs of summons, and this led to inaccuracies. The degree was conferred not by writ but by corporeal ceremonies, the oldest of which may hold clues to the origins of the Order of the Coif in the fourteenth century. The First Part lists recorded creation ceremonies as noted in reports, diaries, chronicles, and the prothonotaries’ remembrances, collated with the relevant public records. It gives precise dates of creation, lists of patrons, and a list of mottoes. The Second Part contains select unpublished descriptions of creations, and texts of the speeches made to new serjeants. An introduction traces the history of the order in outline from the thirteenth century to 1921.

4.          PLACITA CORONE  or La Corone Pledee devant Justices.
             Edited by J. M. KAYE, Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford. (1966).   0 85423 115 3
             members: £20  ($40) inclusive;  non-members: £24  ($48).

This volume contains the text and translation of two radically differing versions of a hitherto unprinted treatise on criminal procedure written in the late thirteenth century.  The treatise is primarily a set of precedents for the conduct of appeals of felony before itinerant justices, and contains also cases illustrative of gaol delivery procedure. The work was probably intended for laymen - justices and officials - rather than pleaders or advocates. The introduction deals with the manuscripts, the authorship and date of the treatise, and with selected points of legal interest. An appendix contains a transcription of a second, less important, treatise called Tractatus de Corona, an epitome of certain passages in Bracton.

3.          A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE INNS OF COURT AND CHANCERY.
             Edited by D. S. BLAND, ma, Assistant Director of Extra-Mural Studies, Liverpool University.
             With an introduction by Sir CECIL CARR, kcb, qc, fba.   (1965). 0 85423 116 1
             members:  £20  ($40) inclusive;  non-members:  £24  ($48).
 
An annotated list of over 800 items divided into: Manuscript Sources, General Works, The Temple, Gray’s Inn, Lincoln’s Inn, Inns of Chancery, Serjeant’s Inn, King’s Inns (Dublin), Drama, Literature, Education, Nineteenth-Century Reform, The Legal Profession.

2.          BRACTON: THE PROBLEM OF HIS TEXT.
             Edited by H. G. RICHARDSON, fba.,
             Being an expansion of a Lecture delivered before the Selden Society in the Hall of
             Gray’s Inn on March 28, 1961.   (1965).       0 85423 117 X
             members: £20  ($40) inclusive;  non-members: £24  ($48).

The work is in two parts. Part I, in eight chapters, deals with problems of Bracton’s text. Part II gives Bracton’s literary sources other than those printed by Maitland in Bracton and Azo, the text of Bracton being printed on facing pages.  Specimen manuscripts are included.  There is also a bibliography, and an index of names and subjects.

1.          THE LETTERS OF FREDERIC WILLIAM MAITLAND.
             Edited by C. H. S. FIFOOT, fba,  Reader in Common Law to the Council of Legal Education; Honorary
             Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford.   (1965).   0 85423 120 X
             members: £20  ($40) inclusive.   Non-members:  £24  ($48).

The edition comprises 500 letters from Maitland. These were all that had then been traced save for the few that are only the bare record of business appointments.  They are annotated as fully as possible and there are three short introductions to different periods of Maitland’s life.  But care is taken not to stand between him and the reader.  A second volume was published in 1995 as Vol.11 in this series.
 

Return to index.

Supplementary Series:   Volumes in Preparation

THE COMMON BENCH AND THE KING’S BENCH JUSTICES IN THE REIGN OF HENRY III.
Compiled by the late C. A. F. MEEKINGS, and Dr DAVID CROOK of the Public Record Office.

Among the unpublished works left by the late Mr. Meekings was a study, written around 1950, of the professional composition of the King’s Bench and of the careers of its justices in the reign of Henry III.  Dr. Crook has undertaken the completion of the unfinished portion, and a revision of the whole to take account of recent scholarship, and has extended its coverage to include the Common Bench.

THE EARLIEST BLACK BOOKS OF LINCOLN’S INN.
Edited by Professor E. W. IVES of the University of Birmingham.

The first volume of The Black Books of Lincoln’s Inn, published by the Inn in 1897, omitted material which throws a unique light on residence and the educational system at the fifteenth-century inns of court.  This volume will be a full, scholarly edition of the earliest manuscripts, taking account of recent scholarship.
 

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF MANUSCRIPT LAW REPORTS,  1250–1700.
Compiled by Sir JOHN BAKER, qc, fba, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, and
Professor D. IBBETSON, Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford.

Given the importance of manuscript law reports, which are frequently of better quality than anything in print, it is rather surprising that no bibliography of the later reports has ever been attempted.  For the medieval period, this volume will replace Miss Nicholson’s Handlist of Year Books Extant, issued by the Society in 1956 and now out of print.
 

LEGAL MANUSCRIPTS IN THE PHILLIPPS COLLECTION.
Compiled by Sir JOHN BAKER, qc, fba, Fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

The collection of manuscripts formed by Sir Thomas Phillipps in the 19th century included one of the most important collections of English legal manuscripts ever formed.  The collection was dispersed over many years of sales, and this volume will reproduce extracts from the sale catalogues, with notes of the present locations of the manuscripts, almost all of which have been traced.  An appendix will give extracts from the catalogues of the principal dealers from whome Phillips bought legal manuscripts.
 

Return to index.

OTHER VOLUMES PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY

A GENERAL GUIDE TO THE SOCIETY’S PUBLICATIONS.
Edited by Dr A. K. R. KIRALFY, Reader in Law, and GARETH JONES, Lecturer in Law, King’s College, University of London  (1960).    0 85423 027 0

This contains an indexed summary of the introductions of Volumes 1 - 79 of the annual series.  It was superseded by the volume listed next.

A CENTENARY GUIDE TO THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE SELDEN SOCIETY.
Edited by the Literary Directors  (1987).  0 85423 179 X

This continues the summaries to Vol.102 and adds summaries of the Supplementary Series and other publications. The Patrons and officers of the Society during the first hundred years are listed, with photographs of past Literary Directors.  There is also a brief history of the Society and a survey of its projects and publications.  The volume is fully indexed.   It is case-bound in blue cloth, matching the annual volumes.

members  £30  ($60)  inclusive;   non-members  £40  ($80).

ENGLISH LEGAL MANUSCRIPTS IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
A descriptive list, compiled by Dr J. H. BAKER, fba, Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge.
Paper covers, laminated.
                Part I:  Medieval and Renaissance  (1985)    0 85423 144 7
                members  £8  ($16) inclusive;   non-members:  £10  ($20).
                Part II:  1558–1902  (1990)    0 85423 149 8
                members  £20  ($40) inclusive;   non-members  £25  ($50).

TABLE-TALK OF JOHN SELDEN
edited by the Rt. Hon. Sir Frederick Pollock   (1927)      (out of print)      0 85423 065 3
 

A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ABRIDGMENTS, DIGESTS, DICTIONARIES AND INDEXES OF ENGLISH LAW
By John D. Cowley  (1932) 0 85423 108 0
Reprinted by Gaunt & Sons Inc., 1979.   Available from the Society to members, price:   £85  ($125)
 

Return to index.

WALL-CHART

THE HUMBER FERRY CASE 1348

Published in 1985 to mark the American Bar Association meeting in London, this wall-chart displays in facsimile, with transcriptions and translations, the original documents of this famous case in the history of contract.  Captions explain the nature of each document, the task of the editor and the significance of the case itself.  The chart measures 28 x 22 inches (71 x 57 cm) and is supplied in a protective tube.  Price to members £18 ($36) including postage and packing. Price to non-members £25 ($50). More information about the chart is found in the attached flyer and order form.
 

Return to index.

LECTURES  AND  PAMPHLETS


Lecture Series  ISSN  1363–4216

The entire Selden Society Lecture Series, 1952–2001, has been reprinted in a bound volume of over 700 pages by Hein Inc. for the Society.  A short introduction and table of contents, explaining the background to the series and to some of the occasions of the lectures, has been added. (2004).                  1–57588–814–9

Members only may obtain copies from the Society for £60 ($120), including dispatch if payment is received with order.  Non-members should apply to Hein, Inc.

Price for individual lectures £9 ($18) each;  inclusive to members.

THE WELSH LEGAL TRIADS. Dr. Sara Elin Roberts, University of Bangor.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2008) (to be published)

BLACKSTONE AS LAWYER. Wilfrid Prest, Professor of Law, University of Adelaide.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2007) (to be published)

F.W. MAITLAND AND THE ENGLISHNESS OF ENGLISH LAW.
J. H. Hudson, Professor of Legal History, University of St Andrews.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2006)       0 85423 220 6

LEGAL EDUCATION IN LONDON 1250–1850.
Sir John Baker, Dowining Professor of the Laws of England, University of Cambridge, and Fellow of University College London.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2005)       0 85423 215 X

THE VARIED LIFE OF THE SELF-INFORMING JURY.
James Oldham, St Thomas More Professor of the Law and Legal History, Georgetown University.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2004)       0 85423 180 3

LAWYERS AND THE STATE:
The Varieties of Legal History
Patrick Wormald, Student of Christ’s church College, Oxford.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2001)       0 85423 185 4

COMMON LAW AND IUS COMMUNE
David Ibbetson, Regius Professor of Civil Law, University of Cambridge.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 2001)       0 85423 185 4

OBSERVING AND RECORDING THE MEDIEVAL BAR AND BENCH AT WORK.
The Origins of Law Reporting in England
Dr. Paul Brand, fba, Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1998)       0 85423 130 7

VICTORIAN LAW AND THE INDUSTRIAL SPIRIT.
Professor A. W. B. Simpson, fba.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1994)       0 85423 169 2

THE THIRD UNIVERSITY OF ENGLAND.
The Inns of Court and the Common Law Tradition.
J. H. Baker, qc, fba, Professor of English Legal History, Cambridge University, Honorary Bencher of the Inner Temple.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1990)              0 85423 164 1

WHY THE HISTORY OF CANON LAW IS NOT WRITTEN.
Charles Donahue Jr., Professor of Law, Harvard Law School.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1984.)      0 85423 159 5

CANON LAW AND ENGLISH COMMON LAW.
R. H. Helmholz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1982.)       0 85423 154 4

THE NATURE OF BLACKSTONE’S ACHIEVEMENT.
S. F. C. Milsom, fba, Fellow of St. John’s College and Professor of English Law, Cambridge University.
(Selden Society Lecture, May 31st 1980, delivered at Pembroke College, Oxford, at the Blackstone bicentenary commemoration.)                                                              0 85423 105 6

ENGLISH LAW IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY: Reform in an Age of Change.
G. R. Elton, fba, Fellow of Clare College and Professor of English Constitutional History, Cambridge University.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1978.) 0 85423 106 4

SIR MATTHEW HALE, 1609–1676.
Catalogue of an exhibition in the Old Hall, Lincoln’s Inn, 5–7 July 1976, on the occasion of the tercentenary of Hale’s death, with seven illustrations.

HALE AS A LEGAL HISTORIAN.
D. E. C. Yale, Fellow of Christ’s College, and Reader in English Legal History, Cambridge University; of the Inner Temple, Barrister-at-Law.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1976).      0 85423 107 2

SCOTT v SHEPHERD (1773) and the Emergence of the Tort of Negligence.
M. J. Prichard, m.a., ll.b., Fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 1973).     0 85423 101 3

INNS ANCIENT AND MODERN.
A Topographical and Historical Introduction  to the Inns of Court, Inns of Chancery, and Serjeants’ Inns.
The Hon. Mr Justice Megarry, ll.d., fba
(Selden Society Lecture delivered July 14, 1971, during the 94th Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association.).       0 85423 093 9

JOHN SELDEN, 1584–1654.
The Rt. Hon. Sir Eric Fletcher, ll.d., mp., President of the Society.
(Selden Society Lecture, July 9, 1969.)      0 85423 097 1

MAGNA CARTA-EVENT OR DOCUMENT?
Helen M. Cam, cbe, litt.d., fba
(Selden Society Lecture. July 7, 1965.)       0 85423 096 3

USES AND ABUSES OF LEGAL HISTORY:  A Practitioner’s View.
Frederick Bernays Wiener of the District of Columbia Bar.
(Selden Society Lecture, March 29, 1962).      0 85423 087 4

THE MISSION OF THE SELDEN SOCIETY.
Sir Cecil Carr,kcb, qc, President of the Society.
(Selden Society Lecture delivered in the United States Court House, Washington, D.C., on August 30, 1960.)
                                                                                                                                    0 85423 009 2

THE COURT OF KING’S BENCH IN LAW AND HISTORY.
George O. Sayles, ma, d.litt, mria, Burnett-Fletcher Professor of History, University of Aberdeen.
(Selden Society Lecture, March 1959). 0 85423 070 X

SIR JAMES FITZJAMES STEPHEN, 1829–1894,  and His Contribution to the Development of Criminal Law.
Leon Radzinowicz, ll.d., Director of the Department of Criminal Science and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.
(Selden Society Lecture delivered July 30, 1957, during the 80th Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association.)
                                                                                                                                    0 85423 066 1

F. W. MAITLAND: A CHILD’S-EYE VIEW.
Miss Ermengard Maitland.
(Issued in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of Professor Maitland’s death on December 19, 1956.)   0 85423 032 7

LAW AND HISTORY IN THE l9th CENTURY.
C. H. S. Fifoot, ma, fba, Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford, Reader in Common Law in the Inns of Court.
(Lecture, March 13, 1956).  0 85423 014 9

A VICTORIAN LAW REFORMER’S CORRESPONDENCE.
Sir Cecil Carr, K.C.B., Q.C., F.B.A.
(Lecture, March 24, 1955.)  0 85423 011 4

SIR WILLIAM SEARLE HOLDSWORTH, om, 1871–1944.
A Memorial Address by A. L. Goodhart,kbe, qc, fba, Master of University College, Oxford.
(Lecture, March 25, 1954).   0 85423 018 1

FREDERIC WILLIAM MAITLAND, 1850–1906.
A Memorial Address by Henry Arthur Hollond, Vice-Master of Trinity College, Cambridge,
Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of English Law, Honorary Bencher of Lincoln’s Inn.
(Lecture, March 18, 1953). (out of print).  0 85423 091 2

SIR EDWARD COKE, 1552–1952.
Samuel E. Thorne, Professor of Legal History, Harvard University.
(Lecture, March 17, 1952.)  (Published 1957.)     0 85423 082 3
 

Return to index.

VOLUMES  PRODUCED  IN  ASSOCIATION  WITH  OTHER  PUBLISHERS

JONES ON BAILMENTS (1781)
Edited by Professor DAVID IBBETSON, Regius Professor of Civil Law at Cambridge. Published by the Welsh Legal History Society in conjunction with the Selden Society (2007).
members and non-members £35 (US$70).

William Jones’s Essay on the Law of Bailments is one of the most important works of English law to have appeared in the decades after Blackstone’s Commentaries. Building on the judgment of Holt C.J. in Coggs v. Barnard, it analysed the standard of care required of different types of contractual bailees;  and Jones’s views on the subject are still treated with respect today. The editor has annotated Jones’s text and has provided a 100-page introduction placing the work in the dual contexts of eighteenth-century legal thought and the history of bailment at common law. More information about the volume is found in the attached flyer and order form.

GLANVILL, THE TREATISE ON THE LAWS AND CUSTOMS OF ENGLAND, COMMONLY CALLED GLANVILL.
Edited by G. D. G. HALL, ma, Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. Published by Thomas Nelson & Sons Ltd. in association with the Selden Society in "Nelson’s Medieval Texts", 1965. Reprinted by Gaunt Inc., 3011 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida 34217–2199 U.S.A., to whom orders should be addressed. Price to members (other than institutions in North America)  $75.

Glanvill is an account in Latin of the law and practice of the royal court at the end of the reign of Henry II. The authorship is uncertain but the treatise must have been written by a man closely connected with the work of the court as judge or clerk; he may have had some academic training in civil and canon law. The treatise deals briefly with criminal law, but it is mainly concerned with civil pleas begun by writ and using the procedures of inquest and assize. Litigation based on writs is a fundamental characteristic of the common law and the treatise can fairly be called the first text book of the common law. Its merit lies partly in clarity of exposition but much more in the author’s willingness to depart from his basic plan-a commentary on individual writs-in favour of a courageous attempt to expound the law in substantive terms.  There are about forty extant manuscripts of the treatise. This edition presents a new text, based on a Lincoln’s Inn manuscript, with a translation. The notes are primarily designed to make the text easy to follow by providing a system of cross-reference and by explaining obscurities; there are some longer additional notes which serve as introductions to major topics in the treatise. The Introduction discusses the background, the plan of the treatise and its execution, the value of the work, and authorship, sources, the development of the text and the later history of the treatise.
 

BRACTON: ON THE LAWS AND CUSTOMS OF ENGLAND.
Latin text edited by G. E. WOODBINE. Translated, with revisions and notes, by SAMUEL E. THORNE, Professor of Legal History, Harvard University. Published by the Harvard University Press in association with the Selden Society. Vols I & II, 1968;  III & IV, 1976.   (At the suggestion of the Society it was reprinted in 1997 by Hein & Co., Inc.
Price for the set of four volumes:  $395 (less discount of 20% to members); plus dispatch:  $15 in USA, $25 overseas.

Maitland described Bracton as "the crown and flower of English medieval jurisprudence". One of the great law books of the world in its own right, circumstances give it a remarkable place in the history of legal thought in general as well as the common law in particular. It marks the confluence of two legal cultures. The author’s Romanist learning and method enabled him to analyse the law and practice of his day in terms of concepts far more refined and a vocabulary far more subtle than those reflected in the plea rolls as being in daily use.

For reasons upon which Professor Thorne throws new light, the manuscripts provide every kind of textual problem; and there has hitherto been no proper translation, no sustained effort to establish the true sense of what the author wrote. Although tantamount to a new edition, the present work is based upon the edition by G. E. Woodbine published by the Yale University Press in four volumes between 1915 and 1942. The first two of the present volumes were published in 1968, just seven centuries after Bracton’s death, and only one year short of four centuries after the appearance of the first printed edition. Volume I reproduces the first volume of the Woodbine edition, which was devoted to Woodbine’s discussion of the manuscripts and of the addiciones; to this there is added a very important Introduction by Professor Thorne. Volume II reproduces the text of Woodbine’s Volume II, but has on the facing pages Professor Thorne’s translation and notes. Volumes III and IV follow the same pattern as Volume II; but the Introduction to Vol. III presents a radical revision of the origins of the treatise and of its authorship.
 

BRITTON.
This epitome of Bracton, dating from the reign of Edward I, was edited in two volumes by F. M. Nichols for Oxford University Press in 1865. At the suggestion of the Society it was reprinted in 1983 by Gaunt & Sons Inc., 3011 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, Florida 34217–2199, U.S.A., to whom orders should be addressed. Price to members  $175.
 

EARLDOMS IN FEE: A STUDY OF PEERAGE LAW AND HISTORY. By Sir GEOFFREY ELLIS, BT. With a foreword by G. D. SQUIBB, Q.C. Published by St. Catherine’s Press 1963.

The author, counsel to the Crown in peerage cases for nearly 30 years, gives his opinion on the unsettled question of the doctrine of abeyance. In doing so he ranges over historical and legal matters far beyond what would have been appropriate in forensic argument and makes a valuable contribution to the constitutional history of the middle ages.

The small remaining stock of this work has been presented to the Society and copies are offered to members at the low price of £25 ($50), which includes all dispatch cost where payment is received with order.
 

Return to index.


Selden Home Page

About the Selden Society

Selden Publications

Ordering Information

Contact us

Harvard Law School


This page last updated 10/04/12. Contact Rosemary Spang with comments.
URL: http://www.law.harvard.edu /programs/selden_society/pub.html.
Copyright © 1999–2012. The Selden Society. All rights reserved.